Spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) along two freshwater-estuarine transects in the Florida Coastal Everglades

Sharon M L Ewe, Evelyn E. Gaiser, Daniel Childers, David Iwaniec, Victor H. Rivera-Monroy, Robert R. Twilley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present here a 4-year dataset (2001-2004) on the spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) by dominant primary producers (sawgrass, periphyton, mangroves, and seagrasses) along two transects in the oligotrophic Florida Everglades coastal landscape. The 17 sites of the Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research (FCE LTER) program are located along fresh-estuarine gradients in Shark River Slough (SRS) and Taylor River/C-111/Florida Bay (TS/Ph) basins that drain the western and southern Everglades, respectively. Within the SRS basin, sawgrass and periphyton ANPP did not differ significantly among sites but mangrove ANPP was highest at the site nearest the Gulf of Mexico. In the southern Everglades transect, there was a productivity peak in sawgrass and periphyton at the upper estuarine ecotone within Taylor River but no trends were observed in the C-111 Basin for either primary producer. Over the 4 years, average sawgrass ANPP in both basins ranged from 255 to 606 g m-2 year-1. Average periphyton productivity at SRS and TS/Ph was 17-68 g C m-2 year-1 and 342-10371 g C m-2 year-1, respectively. Mangrove productivity ranged from 340 g m-2 year-1 at Taylor River to 2208 g m-2 year-1 at the lower estuarine Shark River site. Average Thalassia testudinum productivity ranged from 91 to 396 g m -2 year-1 and was 4-fold greater at the site nearest the Gulf of Mexico than in eastern Florida Bay. There were no differences in periphyton productivity at Florida Bay. Interannual comparisons revealed no significant differences within each primary producer at either SRS or TS/Ph with the exception of sawgrass at SRS and the C-111 Basin. Future research will address difficulties in assessing and comparing ANPP of different primary producers along gradients as well as the significance of belowground production to the total productivity of this ecosystem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-474
Number of pages16
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume569
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

primary productivity
transect
Productivity
sharks
periphyton
Rivers
productivity
shark
rivers
river
basins
Catchments
mangrove
Gulf of Mexico
basin
belowground production
ecotones
research programs
net primary production
ecotone

Keywords

  • Avicennia germinans
  • Cladium jamaicense
  • Laguncularia racemosa
  • Periphyton
  • Rhizophora mangle
  • Thalassia testudinum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Oceanography
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Pollution
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) along two freshwater-estuarine transects in the Florida Coastal Everglades. / Ewe, Sharon M L; Gaiser, Evelyn E.; Childers, Daniel; Iwaniec, David; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.; Twilley, Robert R.

In: Hydrobiologia, Vol. 569, No. 1, 10.2006, p. 459-474.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ewe, Sharon M L ; Gaiser, Evelyn E. ; Childers, Daniel ; Iwaniec, David ; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H. ; Twilley, Robert R. / Spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) along two freshwater-estuarine transects in the Florida Coastal Everglades. In: Hydrobiologia. 2006 ; Vol. 569, No. 1. pp. 459-474.
@article{3d8bd3151058480f9d18762b444109a5,
title = "Spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) along two freshwater-estuarine transects in the Florida Coastal Everglades",
abstract = "We present here a 4-year dataset (2001-2004) on the spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) by dominant primary producers (sawgrass, periphyton, mangroves, and seagrasses) along two transects in the oligotrophic Florida Everglades coastal landscape. The 17 sites of the Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research (FCE LTER) program are located along fresh-estuarine gradients in Shark River Slough (SRS) and Taylor River/C-111/Florida Bay (TS/Ph) basins that drain the western and southern Everglades, respectively. Within the SRS basin, sawgrass and periphyton ANPP did not differ significantly among sites but mangrove ANPP was highest at the site nearest the Gulf of Mexico. In the southern Everglades transect, there was a productivity peak in sawgrass and periphyton at the upper estuarine ecotone within Taylor River but no trends were observed in the C-111 Basin for either primary producer. Over the 4 years, average sawgrass ANPP in both basins ranged from 255 to 606 g m-2 year-1. Average periphyton productivity at SRS and TS/Ph was 17-68 g C m-2 year-1 and 342-10371 g C m-2 year-1, respectively. Mangrove productivity ranged from 340 g m-2 year-1 at Taylor River to 2208 g m-2 year-1 at the lower estuarine Shark River site. Average Thalassia testudinum productivity ranged from 91 to 396 g m -2 year-1 and was 4-fold greater at the site nearest the Gulf of Mexico than in eastern Florida Bay. There were no differences in periphyton productivity at Florida Bay. Interannual comparisons revealed no significant differences within each primary producer at either SRS or TS/Ph with the exception of sawgrass at SRS and the C-111 Basin. Future research will address difficulties in assessing and comparing ANPP of different primary producers along gradients as well as the significance of belowground production to the total productivity of this ecosystem.",
keywords = "Avicennia germinans, Cladium jamaicense, Laguncularia racemosa, Periphyton, Rhizophora mangle, Thalassia testudinum",
author = "Ewe, {Sharon M L} and Gaiser, {Evelyn E.} and Daniel Childers and David Iwaniec and Rivera-Monroy, {Victor H.} and Twilley, {Robert R.}",
year = "2006",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1007/s10750-006-0149-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "569",
pages = "459--474",
journal = "Hydrobiologia",
issn = "0018-8158",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) along two freshwater-estuarine transects in the Florida Coastal Everglades

AU - Ewe, Sharon M L

AU - Gaiser, Evelyn E.

AU - Childers, Daniel

AU - Iwaniec, David

AU - Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.

AU - Twilley, Robert R.

PY - 2006/10

Y1 - 2006/10

N2 - We present here a 4-year dataset (2001-2004) on the spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) by dominant primary producers (sawgrass, periphyton, mangroves, and seagrasses) along two transects in the oligotrophic Florida Everglades coastal landscape. The 17 sites of the Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research (FCE LTER) program are located along fresh-estuarine gradients in Shark River Slough (SRS) and Taylor River/C-111/Florida Bay (TS/Ph) basins that drain the western and southern Everglades, respectively. Within the SRS basin, sawgrass and periphyton ANPP did not differ significantly among sites but mangrove ANPP was highest at the site nearest the Gulf of Mexico. In the southern Everglades transect, there was a productivity peak in sawgrass and periphyton at the upper estuarine ecotone within Taylor River but no trends were observed in the C-111 Basin for either primary producer. Over the 4 years, average sawgrass ANPP in both basins ranged from 255 to 606 g m-2 year-1. Average periphyton productivity at SRS and TS/Ph was 17-68 g C m-2 year-1 and 342-10371 g C m-2 year-1, respectively. Mangrove productivity ranged from 340 g m-2 year-1 at Taylor River to 2208 g m-2 year-1 at the lower estuarine Shark River site. Average Thalassia testudinum productivity ranged from 91 to 396 g m -2 year-1 and was 4-fold greater at the site nearest the Gulf of Mexico than in eastern Florida Bay. There were no differences in periphyton productivity at Florida Bay. Interannual comparisons revealed no significant differences within each primary producer at either SRS or TS/Ph with the exception of sawgrass at SRS and the C-111 Basin. Future research will address difficulties in assessing and comparing ANPP of different primary producers along gradients as well as the significance of belowground production to the total productivity of this ecosystem.

AB - We present here a 4-year dataset (2001-2004) on the spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) by dominant primary producers (sawgrass, periphyton, mangroves, and seagrasses) along two transects in the oligotrophic Florida Everglades coastal landscape. The 17 sites of the Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research (FCE LTER) program are located along fresh-estuarine gradients in Shark River Slough (SRS) and Taylor River/C-111/Florida Bay (TS/Ph) basins that drain the western and southern Everglades, respectively. Within the SRS basin, sawgrass and periphyton ANPP did not differ significantly among sites but mangrove ANPP was highest at the site nearest the Gulf of Mexico. In the southern Everglades transect, there was a productivity peak in sawgrass and periphyton at the upper estuarine ecotone within Taylor River but no trends were observed in the C-111 Basin for either primary producer. Over the 4 years, average sawgrass ANPP in both basins ranged from 255 to 606 g m-2 year-1. Average periphyton productivity at SRS and TS/Ph was 17-68 g C m-2 year-1 and 342-10371 g C m-2 year-1, respectively. Mangrove productivity ranged from 340 g m-2 year-1 at Taylor River to 2208 g m-2 year-1 at the lower estuarine Shark River site. Average Thalassia testudinum productivity ranged from 91 to 396 g m -2 year-1 and was 4-fold greater at the site nearest the Gulf of Mexico than in eastern Florida Bay. There were no differences in periphyton productivity at Florida Bay. Interannual comparisons revealed no significant differences within each primary producer at either SRS or TS/Ph with the exception of sawgrass at SRS and the C-111 Basin. Future research will address difficulties in assessing and comparing ANPP of different primary producers along gradients as well as the significance of belowground production to the total productivity of this ecosystem.

KW - Avicennia germinans

KW - Cladium jamaicense

KW - Laguncularia racemosa

KW - Periphyton

KW - Rhizophora mangle

KW - Thalassia testudinum

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33746763490&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33746763490&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10750-006-0149-5

DO - 10.1007/s10750-006-0149-5

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33746763490

VL - 569

SP - 459

EP - 474

JO - Hydrobiologia

JF - Hydrobiologia

SN - 0018-8158

IS - 1

ER -