Spatial analysis of factors influencing long-term stress in the grizzly bear (ursus arctos) population of alberta, canada

Mathieu L. Bourbonnais, Trisalyn Nelson, Marc R L Cattet, Chris T. Darimont, Gordon B. Stenhouse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-invasive measures for assessing long-term stress in free ranging mammals are an increasingly important approach for understanding physiological responses to landscape conditions. Using a spatially and temporally expansive dataset of hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) generated from a threatened grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population in Alberta, Canada, we quantified how variables representing habitat conditions and anthropogenic disturbance impact long-term stress in grizzly bears. We characterized spatial variability in male and female HCC point data using kernel density estimation and quantified variable influence on spatial patterns of male and female HCC stress surfaces using random forests. Separate models were developed for regions inside and outside of parks and protected areas to account for substantial differences in anthropogenic activity and disturbance within the study area. Variance explained in the random forest models ranged from 55.34% to 74.96% for males and 58.15% to 68.46% for females. Predicted HCC levels were higher for females compared to males. Generally, high spatially continuous female HCC levels were associated with parks and protected areas while low-to-moderate levels were associated with increased anthropogenic disturbance. In contrast, male HCC levels were low in parks and protected areas and low-to-moderate in areas with increased anthropogenic disturbance. Spatial variability in gender-specific HCC levels reveal that the type and intensity of external stressors are not uniform across the landscape and that male and female grizzly bears may be exposed to, or perceive, potential stressors differently. We suggest observed spatial patterns of long-term stress may be the result of the availability and distribution of foods related to disturbance features, potential sexual segregation in available habitat selection, and may not be influenced by sources of mortality which represent acute traumas. In this wildlife system and others, conservation and management efforts can benefit by understanding spatial- and gender-based stress responses to landscape conditions. Copyright:

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere83768
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ursidae
Alberta
Spatial Analysis
Ursus arctos
Hair
trichomes
Canada
cortisol
Hydrocortisone
hairs
anthropogenic activities
Population
conservation areas
Ecosystem
Mammals
gender
factor analysis
habitat preferences
food availability
plant response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Spatial analysis of factors influencing long-term stress in the grizzly bear (ursus arctos) population of alberta, canada. / Bourbonnais, Mathieu L.; Nelson, Trisalyn; Cattet, Marc R L; Darimont, Chris T.; Stenhouse, Gordon B.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 12, e83768, 27.12.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bourbonnais, Mathieu L. ; Nelson, Trisalyn ; Cattet, Marc R L ; Darimont, Chris T. ; Stenhouse, Gordon B. / Spatial analysis of factors influencing long-term stress in the grizzly bear (ursus arctos) population of alberta, canada. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 12.
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