Sound source localization identification accuracy: Envelope dependencies

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Sound source localization accuracy as measured in an identification procedure in a front azimuth sound field was studied for click trains, modulated noises, and a modulated tonal carrier. Sound source localization accuracy was determined as a function of the number of clicks in a 64 Hz click train and click rate for a 500 ms duration click train. The clicks were either broadband or high-pass filtered. Sound source localization accuracy was also measured for a single broadband filtered click and compared to a similar broadband filtered, short-duration noise. Sound source localization accuracy was determined as a function of sinusoidal amplitude modulation and the "transposed" process of modulation of filtered noises and a 4 kHz tone. Different rates (16 to 512 Hz) of modulation (including unmodulated conditions) were used. Providing modulation for filtered click stimuli, filtered noises, and the 4 kHz tone had, at most, a very small effect on sound source localization accuracy. These data suggest that amplitude modulation, while providing information about interaural time differences in headphone studies, does not have much influence on sound source localization accuracy in a sound field.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)173-185
    Number of pages13
    JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Volume142
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

    Fingerprint

    envelopes
    acoustics
    sound fields
    broadband
    modulation
    azimuth
    stimuli
    Localization
    Sound
    Modulation
    Train

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

    Cite this

    Sound source localization identification accuracy : Envelope dependencies. / Yost, William.

    In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 142, No. 1, 01.07.2017, p. 173-185.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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