Socioeconomic Disparities in Pain: The Role of Economic Hardship and Daily Financial Worry

Rebeca Rios, Alex J. Zautra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Socioeconomic disparities in pain may be attributable to both greater frequency in stressful financial events as well as greater vulnerability to economic hardship for those at the lower end of the socioeconomic spectrum. This study investigated the effects of economic hardship and daily financial worry on daily pain among women with a chronic musculoskeletal condition. Design: The sample consisted of 250 women with osteoarthritis (N = 105), fibromyalgia (N = 46), or both (N = 99). During an initial assessment, participants' chronic pain diagnosis, level of economic hardship, and demographic information were ascertained. For a period of 30 days, daily diary assessments recorded daily financial worries and daily pain severity. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel modeling for repeated measures in SAS PROC MIXED. Main Outcome Measure: Daily pain severity. Results: Conditions of economic hardship and daily ratings of financial worry both had significant detrimental effects on daily pain. Participants with greater levels of economic hardship reported greater pain severity in response to daily financial worries than their counterparts with little or no economic hardship. Further, participants in the sample who were not employed and who reported higher levels of economic hardship exhibited the most pain reactivity in response to daily financial worries. Conclusion: Economic hardship was associated not only with greater exposure to daily financial worries but also with greater vulnerability to pain on days when daily financial worries were experienced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-66
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Economics
Pain
Fibromyalgia
Chronic Pain
Osteoarthritis
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Economic hardship
  • Socioeconomic disparities
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Socioeconomic Disparities in Pain : The Role of Economic Hardship and Daily Financial Worry. / Rios, Rebeca; Zautra, Alex J.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 58-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rios, Rebeca ; Zautra, Alex J. / Socioeconomic Disparities in Pain : The Role of Economic Hardship and Daily Financial Worry. In: Health Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 58-66.
@article{18413363412547aaa4506f7069873073,
title = "Socioeconomic Disparities in Pain: The Role of Economic Hardship and Daily Financial Worry",
abstract = "Objective: Socioeconomic disparities in pain may be attributable to both greater frequency in stressful financial events as well as greater vulnerability to economic hardship for those at the lower end of the socioeconomic spectrum. This study investigated the effects of economic hardship and daily financial worry on daily pain among women with a chronic musculoskeletal condition. Design: The sample consisted of 250 women with osteoarthritis (N = 105), fibromyalgia (N = 46), or both (N = 99). During an initial assessment, participants' chronic pain diagnosis, level of economic hardship, and demographic information were ascertained. For a period of 30 days, daily diary assessments recorded daily financial worries and daily pain severity. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel modeling for repeated measures in SAS PROC MIXED. Main Outcome Measure: Daily pain severity. Results: Conditions of economic hardship and daily ratings of financial worry both had significant detrimental effects on daily pain. Participants with greater levels of economic hardship reported greater pain severity in response to daily financial worries than their counterparts with little or no economic hardship. Further, participants in the sample who were not employed and who reported higher levels of economic hardship exhibited the most pain reactivity in response to daily financial worries. Conclusion: Economic hardship was associated not only with greater exposure to daily financial worries but also with greater vulnerability to pain on days when daily financial worries were experienced.",
keywords = "Chronic pain, Economic hardship, Socioeconomic disparities, Women",
author = "Rebeca Rios and Zautra, {Alex J.}",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1037/a0022025",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "58--66",
journal = "Health Psychology",
issn = "0278-6133",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socioeconomic Disparities in Pain

T2 - The Role of Economic Hardship and Daily Financial Worry

AU - Rios, Rebeca

AU - Zautra, Alex J.

PY - 2011/1

Y1 - 2011/1

N2 - Objective: Socioeconomic disparities in pain may be attributable to both greater frequency in stressful financial events as well as greater vulnerability to economic hardship for those at the lower end of the socioeconomic spectrum. This study investigated the effects of economic hardship and daily financial worry on daily pain among women with a chronic musculoskeletal condition. Design: The sample consisted of 250 women with osteoarthritis (N = 105), fibromyalgia (N = 46), or both (N = 99). During an initial assessment, participants' chronic pain diagnosis, level of economic hardship, and demographic information were ascertained. For a period of 30 days, daily diary assessments recorded daily financial worries and daily pain severity. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel modeling for repeated measures in SAS PROC MIXED. Main Outcome Measure: Daily pain severity. Results: Conditions of economic hardship and daily ratings of financial worry both had significant detrimental effects on daily pain. Participants with greater levels of economic hardship reported greater pain severity in response to daily financial worries than their counterparts with little or no economic hardship. Further, participants in the sample who were not employed and who reported higher levels of economic hardship exhibited the most pain reactivity in response to daily financial worries. Conclusion: Economic hardship was associated not only with greater exposure to daily financial worries but also with greater vulnerability to pain on days when daily financial worries were experienced.

AB - Objective: Socioeconomic disparities in pain may be attributable to both greater frequency in stressful financial events as well as greater vulnerability to economic hardship for those at the lower end of the socioeconomic spectrum. This study investigated the effects of economic hardship and daily financial worry on daily pain among women with a chronic musculoskeletal condition. Design: The sample consisted of 250 women with osteoarthritis (N = 105), fibromyalgia (N = 46), or both (N = 99). During an initial assessment, participants' chronic pain diagnosis, level of economic hardship, and demographic information were ascertained. For a period of 30 days, daily diary assessments recorded daily financial worries and daily pain severity. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel modeling for repeated measures in SAS PROC MIXED. Main Outcome Measure: Daily pain severity. Results: Conditions of economic hardship and daily ratings of financial worry both had significant detrimental effects on daily pain. Participants with greater levels of economic hardship reported greater pain severity in response to daily financial worries than their counterparts with little or no economic hardship. Further, participants in the sample who were not employed and who reported higher levels of economic hardship exhibited the most pain reactivity in response to daily financial worries. Conclusion: Economic hardship was associated not only with greater exposure to daily financial worries but also with greater vulnerability to pain on days when daily financial worries were experienced.

KW - Chronic pain

KW - Economic hardship

KW - Socioeconomic disparities

KW - Women

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79951566107&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79951566107&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/a0022025

DO - 10.1037/a0022025

M3 - Article

C2 - 21299295

AN - SCOPUS:79951566107

VL - 30

SP - 58

EP - 66

JO - Health Psychology

JF - Health Psychology

SN - 0278-6133

IS - 1

ER -