Social workers' personal spiritual characteristics and their conceptualizations of spirituality and religion: A mixed method study

David Hodge, Stephanie C. Boddie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Do social workers' personal spiritual characteristics affect their conceptualizations of spirituality and religion? In light of growing professional interest in spirituality and religion, we attempt to answer this question using amixed methods approach in conjunction with a nationally representative sample of NASW-affiliated graduate students (N = 303). The results suggest that respondents' faith tradition, orthodoxy, and degree of spiritual motivation have a relatively minor effect upon how they defined (1) spirituality, (2) religion, and (3) their understanding of the relationship between spirituality and religion. We conclude by discussing the implications of the findings and suggesting avenues for further research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-70
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 18 2007

Keywords

  • Faith
  • Orthodoxy
  • Religion
  • Spiritual motivation
  • Spirituality
  • Tradition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Social workers' personal spiritual characteristics and their conceptualizations of spirituality and religion: A mixed method study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this