Social Work Is a Human Rights Profession

Susan Mapp, Jane McPherson, David Androff, Shirley Gatenio Gabel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As defined by the International Federation of Social Workers, social work is a human rights profession. This is explicitly stated in the professional codes of ethics in many nations. However, the most recent version of the Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers continues to exclude any mention of human rights, fitting in with the history of U.S. exceptionalism on this subject. Social workers around the world have a long history of working for the achievement of human rights, including an explicit grounding of practice in human rights principles: human dignity, nondiscrimination, participation, transparency, and accountability. Utilizing these principles, U.S. social workers can move from the deficit model of the needs-based approach to competently contextualizing individual issues in their larger human rights framework. In this way, social work can address larger social problems and make way for the concurrent achievement of human rights. This article explains these principles and provides a case example of how to apply them in practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-269
Number of pages11
JournalSocial work
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2019

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social work
human rights
profession
social worker
moral philosophy
human dignity
history
Social Problems
federation
transparency
deficit
responsibility
participation

Keywords

  • Code of Ethics
  • human rights
  • social work practice
  • social work profession

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Mapp, S., McPherson, J., Androff, D., & Gatenio Gabel, S. (2019). Social Work Is a Human Rights Profession. Social work, 64(3), 259-269. https://doi.org/10.1093/sw/swz023

Social Work Is a Human Rights Profession. / Mapp, Susan; McPherson, Jane; Androff, David; Gatenio Gabel, Shirley.

In: Social work, Vol. 64, No. 3, 02.07.2019, p. 259-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mapp, S, McPherson, J, Androff, D & Gatenio Gabel, S 2019, 'Social Work Is a Human Rights Profession', Social work, vol. 64, no. 3, pp. 259-269. https://doi.org/10.1093/sw/swz023
Mapp S, McPherson J, Androff D, Gatenio Gabel S. Social Work Is a Human Rights Profession. Social work. 2019 Jul 2;64(3):259-269. https://doi.org/10.1093/sw/swz023
Mapp, Susan ; McPherson, Jane ; Androff, David ; Gatenio Gabel, Shirley. / Social Work Is a Human Rights Profession. In: Social work. 2019 ; Vol. 64, No. 3. pp. 259-269.
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