Social work and the House of Islam: Orienting practitioners to the beliefs and values of Muslims in the United States

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite the media attention focused on the Islamic community after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, Muslims remain one of the most misunderstood populations in the United States. Few articles have appeared in the social work literature orienting practitioners to the Islamic community, and much of the mainstream media coverage misrepresents the population. This article reviews the basic beliefs, practices, and values that commonly characterize, or inform, the House of Islam in the United States. The organizations that embody and sustain the Muslim communities that constitute the House of Islam are profiled, and areas of possible value conflicts are examined. The article concludes by offering suggestions for integrating the article's themes into practice settings. Particular attention is given to enhancing cultural competence and to suggestions for spiritual assessment and interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-173
Number of pages12
JournalSocial work
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cultural diversity
  • Islam
  • Muslims
  • Religion
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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