Social-technical issues facing the humancentric RFID implantee sub-culture through the eyes of Amal Graafstra

Amal Graafstra, Katina Michael, M. G. Michael

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and transponders have traditionally been used to identify domesticated animals so that they can be reunited with their owners in the event that they stray. In the late 1990s, industry started to investigate the benefits of using RFID to identifying non-living things throughout the supply chain toward new efficiencies in business operations. Not long after, people began to consider the possibilities of getting RFID tag or transponder implants for themselves. Mr Amal Graafstra of the United States is one of the first, and probably most well-known 'do it yourselfer' (DIY) implantees, who enjoys building customized projects which enable him to interact with his private social living space. Since 2005, hundreds of people have embarked on a mission to interact with their mobile phones, their cars, and their house via a chip implant, providing personalized settings for their own ultimate convenience. This paper presents some of the socio-technical issues facing the RFID implantee sub-culture, namely health and safety, privacy, security, regulation, and societal perceptions. The paper concludes with a list of recommendations related to implantables for hobbyists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society
Subtitle of host publicationSocial Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10
Pages498-516
Number of pages19
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event2010 IEEE Internationl Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10 - Wollongong, NSW, Australia
Duration: Jun 7 2010Jun 9 2010

Publication series

NameInternational Symposium on Technology and Society, Proceedings

Conference

Conference2010 IEEE Internationl Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10
CountryAustralia
CityWollongong, NSW
Period6/7/106/9/10

Fingerprint

subculture
Radio frequency identification (RFID)
radio
Transponders
do-it-yourselfer
Mobile phones
Supply chains
privacy
Industry
Animals
Railroad cars
animal
Health
supply
regulation
efficiency
industry
event
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Graafstra, A., Michael, K., & Michael, M. G. (2010). Social-technical issues facing the humancentric RFID implantee sub-culture through the eyes of Amal Graafstra. In Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10 (pp. 498-516). [5514602] (International Symposium on Technology and Society, Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1109/ISTAS.2010.5514602

Social-technical issues facing the humancentric RFID implantee sub-culture through the eyes of Amal Graafstra. / Graafstra, Amal; Michael, Katina; Michael, M. G.

Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10. 2010. p. 498-516 5514602 (International Symposium on Technology and Society, Proceedings).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Graafstra, A, Michael, K & Michael, MG 2010, Social-technical issues facing the humancentric RFID implantee sub-culture through the eyes of Amal Graafstra. in Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10., 5514602, International Symposium on Technology and Society, Proceedings, pp. 498-516, 2010 IEEE Internationl Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10, Wollongong, NSW, Australia, 6/7/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISTAS.2010.5514602
Graafstra A, Michael K, Michael MG. Social-technical issues facing the humancentric RFID implantee sub-culture through the eyes of Amal Graafstra. In Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10. 2010. p. 498-516. 5514602. (International Symposium on Technology and Society, Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1109/ISTAS.2010.5514602
Graafstra, Amal ; Michael, Katina ; Michael, M. G. / Social-technical issues facing the humancentric RFID implantee sub-culture through the eyes of Amal Graafstra. Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10. 2010. pp. 498-516 (International Symposium on Technology and Society, Proceedings).
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