Social support, discrimination, and coping as predictors of posttraumatic stress reactions in youth survivors of Hurricane Katrina

Armando Pina, Ian K. Villalta, Claudio D. Ortiz, Amanda C. Gottschall, Natalie M. Costa, Carl F. Weems

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the influence of aspects of the post-Hurricane Katrina recovery environment (i.e., discrimination, social support) and coping behaviors on children's posttraumatic stress reactions (symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], anxiety, and depression). Data corresponding to 46 youth (M = 11.43 years; 39% girls; 33% African American, 67% European American) revealed that greater helpfulness from extrafamilial sources of social support predicted lower levels of child-rated symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression. A positive predictive relation was found between helpfulness from professional support sources and PTSD, perhaps suggesting that parents whose children were experiencing higher PTSD symptom levels sought professional support and reported it to be helpful. Youths' avoidant coping behaviors predicted both PTSD and anxiety symptoms. Discrimination, active coping, and familial support did not predict any of the posttraumatic stress reactions assessed in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)564-574
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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