Social Network Changes Over the School Year Among Elementary School-Aged Children with and Without an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Jill Locke, Connie Kasari, Erin Rotheram-Fuller, Mark Kretzmann, Jeffrey Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the stability of children's social networks and friendship features over one academic school year. Differences in the social network salience between typically developing children, children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and children with a non-ASD disability were explored. As a whole, social network salience increased for all students across the school year; however, children in the upper grades had higher social network salience as the school year progressed than those in the younger grades. Compared to children with a non-ASD disability and typically developing children, children with ASD had significantly lower social network salience and received significantly fewer friendship nominations and more non-preferred nominations across the school year. While these data suggest that children's social networks and patterns of peer relationships are relatively stable over time, school-based interventions that foster social development and peer engagement are still needed for children with ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-47
Number of pages10
JournalSchool Mental Health
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

autism
Social Support
elementary school
social network
school
friendship
disability
Autism Spectrum Disorder
social development
Students

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Friendship
  • Rejection
  • Social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Social Network Changes Over the School Year Among Elementary School-Aged Children with and Without an Autism Spectrum Disorder. / Locke, Jill; Kasari, Connie; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin; Kretzmann, Mark; Jacobs, Jeffrey.

In: School Mental Health, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2013, p. 38-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e07c97f30605433ba8817b4117477ce0,
title = "Social Network Changes Over the School Year Among Elementary School-Aged Children with and Without an Autism Spectrum Disorder",
abstract = "This study examined the stability of children's social networks and friendship features over one academic school year. Differences in the social network salience between typically developing children, children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and children with a non-ASD disability were explored. As a whole, social network salience increased for all students across the school year; however, children in the upper grades had higher social network salience as the school year progressed than those in the younger grades. Compared to children with a non-ASD disability and typically developing children, children with ASD had significantly lower social network salience and received significantly fewer friendship nominations and more non-preferred nominations across the school year. While these data suggest that children's social networks and patterns of peer relationships are relatively stable over time, school-based interventions that foster social development and peer engagement are still needed for children with ASD.",
keywords = "Autism, Friendship, Rejection, Social networks",
author = "Jill Locke and Connie Kasari and Erin Rotheram-Fuller and Mark Kretzmann and Jeffrey Jacobs",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1007/s12310-012-9092-y",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "38--47",
journal = "School Mental Health",
issn = "1866-2625",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social Network Changes Over the School Year Among Elementary School-Aged Children with and Without an Autism Spectrum Disorder

AU - Locke, Jill

AU - Kasari, Connie

AU - Rotheram-Fuller, Erin

AU - Kretzmann, Mark

AU - Jacobs, Jeffrey

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This study examined the stability of children's social networks and friendship features over one academic school year. Differences in the social network salience between typically developing children, children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and children with a non-ASD disability were explored. As a whole, social network salience increased for all students across the school year; however, children in the upper grades had higher social network salience as the school year progressed than those in the younger grades. Compared to children with a non-ASD disability and typically developing children, children with ASD had significantly lower social network salience and received significantly fewer friendship nominations and more non-preferred nominations across the school year. While these data suggest that children's social networks and patterns of peer relationships are relatively stable over time, school-based interventions that foster social development and peer engagement are still needed for children with ASD.

AB - This study examined the stability of children's social networks and friendship features over one academic school year. Differences in the social network salience between typically developing children, children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and children with a non-ASD disability were explored. As a whole, social network salience increased for all students across the school year; however, children in the upper grades had higher social network salience as the school year progressed than those in the younger grades. Compared to children with a non-ASD disability and typically developing children, children with ASD had significantly lower social network salience and received significantly fewer friendship nominations and more non-preferred nominations across the school year. While these data suggest that children's social networks and patterns of peer relationships are relatively stable over time, school-based interventions that foster social development and peer engagement are still needed for children with ASD.

KW - Autism

KW - Friendship

KW - Rejection

KW - Social networks

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85016232768&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85016232768&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12310-012-9092-y

DO - 10.1007/s12310-012-9092-y

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85016232768

VL - 5

SP - 38

EP - 47

JO - School Mental Health

JF - School Mental Health

SN - 1866-2625

IS - 1

ER -