Social motives among Anglo American and Mexican American children: Experimental and projective measures

Spencer Kagan, George P. Knight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

The measurement approaches to social motives, cooperation-competition games and projective tests, have revealed apparently similar findings: Anglo American children are more competitive and higher in n Achievement compared to Mexican American children, who are more cooperative and higher in n Affiliation. The present experiment tested the extent to which (1) competitiveness is related to n Achievement, (2) cooperativeness is related to n Affiliation, and (3) the cultural differences in cooperation-competition are related to those in n Affiliation and n Achievement. Results indicate that social motives inferred from a cooperation-competition game have a meaningful relation to those inferred from a projective test, but that the cultural differences in cooperation-competition are larger and are not explained by cultural differences in n Affiliation and n Achievement. Social motives inferred from each measurement methodology, while somewhat related, are distinct.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-106
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

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