Social justice and people of faith: A transnational perspective

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a paucity of literature in social work on the intersection between social justice and religion, even though the profession's code of ethics articulates the need to advocate for social justice and eliminate religious discrimination. Therefore, this article helps equip social workers to challenge social injustice on behalf of people of faith around the world. Toward this end, the author developed a human rights-based social justice ethic based on the United Nations' (1948) Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The growing problem of religious persecution is discussed, along with strategies to promote religious freedom. It is suggested that social work has a particular duty to advocate for religious freedom because many of the victims of religious persecution are members of marginalized populations with few advocates on the international stage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-148
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Work
Volume52
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 2007

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social justice
faith
religious freedom
social work
human rights
moral philosophy
social worker
UNO
discrimination
profession
Religion
literature

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Oppression
  • Religion
  • Social justice
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Social justice and people of faith : A transnational perspective. / Hodge, David.

In: Social Work, Vol. 52, No. 2, 04.2007, p. 139-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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