Social Connectedness, Self-Efficacy, and Mental Health Outcomes Among Homeless Youth: Prioritizing Approaches to Service Provision in a Time of Limited Agency Resources

Stephanie Begun, Kimberly A. Bender, Samantha M. Brown, Anamika Barman-Adhikari, Kristin Ferguson-Colvin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Homeless youth frequently meet diagnosis criteria for depressive and/or substance use disorder(s). Although prior research has established that both social connectedness and self-efficacy buffer vulnerable youth’s adverse health outcomes, few studies have compared the potential of these protective factors on homeless youth’s mental well-being. The current study analyzes comparative effects of social connectedness and self-efficacy on meeting criteria for major depressive disorder, substance use disorder, and the co-occurrence of both disorders among a sample of 601 service-seeking homeless youth in Austin, Denver, and Los Angeles. Hierarchical logistic regressions indicate that while both social connectedness and self-efficacy constructs are valuable protective factors, social connectedness may offer greater utility, particularly in buffering against more complex mental health outcomes, such as the co-occurrence of depressive and substance use disorders. Accordingly, resource-strapped homeless youth service providers and researchers may benefit from tailoring mental health intervention strategies to further emphasize social connectedness in future efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)989-1014
Number of pages26
JournalYouth and Society
Volume50
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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self-efficacy
mental health
resources
intervention strategy
service provider
social factors
well-being
logistics
time
regression
health

Keywords

  • homeless youth
  • intervention design
  • mental health
  • self-efficacy
  • social connectedness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Social Connectedness, Self-Efficacy, and Mental Health Outcomes Among Homeless Youth : Prioritizing Approaches to Service Provision in a Time of Limited Agency Resources. / Begun, Stephanie; Bender, Kimberly A.; Brown, Samantha M.; Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Ferguson-Colvin, Kristin.

In: Youth and Society, Vol. 50, No. 7, 01.10.2018, p. 989-1014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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