Social Biomimicry

what do ants and bees tell us about organization in the natural world?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The social insects serve as exemplars for social biomimicry, the search for social design inspiration from the natural world. Although their group members are individually much simpler than humans, social insect colonies provide elegant tutorials on the large-scale outcomes that can be achieved by social interactions and self-organizational processes. These range from complex physical structures built by collective effort; to exemplars of flexible work organization; to effective consensus building in group decisions. This special issue highlights examples of the lessons to be learned from the bees and ants, providing ways to think about how humans can (and in some cases should not) borrow from social insect rules of organization and their collective outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-216
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Bioeconomics
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 10 2015

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social insect
work organization
group decision
group membership
bee
ant
organization
interaction
Ants
Work organization
Consensus building
Social interaction
Flexible work
Tutorial
Group decision
Organizational processes

Keywords

  • Collective behavior
  • Self-organization
  • Social biomimicry
  • Social insects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Social Biomimicry : what do ants and bees tell us about organization in the natural world? / Fewell, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Bioeconomics, Vol. 17, No. 3, 10.09.2015, p. 207-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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