SOC vs. SIP; Are we putting too much on one chip?

Robert Aitken, Lawrence Clark, Pieter Hooijmans, Anthony Gadlent, David Allstot, Kenneth Brown, Peter Rickert

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

With every generation, CMOS scaling makes additional chip area available to designers. For several generations now, designers have taken advantage of this extra area by integrating functions that were previously on multiple chips into a single die, a so-called System-on-Chip (SoC). Initially, SoC integration was primarily limited to digital circuitry, embedded SRAM, and processor cores. Recently, advances in technology have made possible the integration of other circuitry, including analog and mixed signal, DRAM, flash and even RF. However, just because something is feasible does not necessarily make it desirable. The panel addresses the question of whether we have pushed the bounds of integration too far - should we build a single chip radio or embedded flash, or are other approaches, such as System-In-Package, better? The panelists have broad experience in the field and will address the question from both technological and business standpoints.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Custom Integrated Circuits Conference
Pages477
Number of pages1
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the IEEE 2004 Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, CICC - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Oct 3 2004Oct 6 2004

Other

OtherProceedings of the IEEE 2004 Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, CICC
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period10/3/0410/6/04

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Dynamic random access storage
Static random access storage
Industry
System-on-chip
System-in-package

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Aitken, R., Clark, L., Hooijmans, P., Gadlent, A., Allstot, D., Brown, K., & Rickert, P. (2004). SOC vs. SIP; Are we putting too much on one chip? In Proceedings of the Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (pp. 477)

SOC vs. SIP; Are we putting too much on one chip? / Aitken, Robert; Clark, Lawrence; Hooijmans, Pieter; Gadlent, Anthony; Allstot, David; Brown, Kenneth; Rickert, Peter.

Proceedings of the Custom Integrated Circuits Conference. 2004. p. 477.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Aitken, R, Clark, L, Hooijmans, P, Gadlent, A, Allstot, D, Brown, K & Rickert, P 2004, SOC vs. SIP; Are we putting too much on one chip? in Proceedings of the Custom Integrated Circuits Conference. pp. 477, Proceedings of the IEEE 2004 Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, CICC, Orlando, FL, United States, 10/3/04.
Aitken R, Clark L, Hooijmans P, Gadlent A, Allstot D, Brown K et al. SOC vs. SIP; Are we putting too much on one chip? In Proceedings of the Custom Integrated Circuits Conference. 2004. p. 477
Aitken, Robert ; Clark, Lawrence ; Hooijmans, Pieter ; Gadlent, Anthony ; Allstot, David ; Brown, Kenneth ; Rickert, Peter. / SOC vs. SIP; Are we putting too much on one chip?. Proceedings of the Custom Integrated Circuits Conference. 2004. pp. 477
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