Small modular reactors

The future of nuclear energy?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are being explored by the NRC and DOE as a means of producing nuclear energy on a smaller scale. Because of their modularity, they are presumed to be both less costly and more efficient to produce. This paper describes the historical context of SMRs, as well as potential issues relating to the social context of SMRs if they are deployed in society on different scales, from the local to the national and international. Understanding SMRs as sociotechnical systems allows for different conception of the role of SMRs as a technology that could potentially reorganize society, which needs to be accounted for prior to deployment. The concept of the sociotechnical imaginary also provides another way of considering how SMRs both shape and are shaped by national imperatives for energy production and markets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Print)9781479949922
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014 - Chicago, United States
Duration: May 23 2014May 24 2014

Other

Other2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period5/23/145/24/14

Fingerprint

Nuclear energy
Energy
Social Context
Historical Context
Socio-technical Systems
Modularity
Conception

Keywords

  • energy production
  • nuclear energy
  • nuclear technology
  • sociotechnical system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Richter, J. (2014). Small modular reactors: The future of nuclear energy? In 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014 [6893449] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/ETHICS.2014.6893449

Small modular reactors : The future of nuclear energy? / Richter, Jennifer.

2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2014. 6893449.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Richter, J 2014, Small modular reactors: The future of nuclear energy? in 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014., 6893449, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014, Chicago, United States, 5/23/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/ETHICS.2014.6893449
Richter J. Small modular reactors: The future of nuclear energy? In 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2014. 6893449 https://doi.org/10.1109/ETHICS.2014.6893449
Richter, Jennifer. / Small modular reactors : The future of nuclear energy?. 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2014.
@inproceedings{587256f097044b6eaee4866c9c6dc140,
title = "Small modular reactors: The future of nuclear energy?",
abstract = "Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are being explored by the NRC and DOE as a means of producing nuclear energy on a smaller scale. Because of their modularity, they are presumed to be both less costly and more efficient to produce. This paper describes the historical context of SMRs, as well as potential issues relating to the social context of SMRs if they are deployed in society on different scales, from the local to the national and international. Understanding SMRs as sociotechnical systems allows for different conception of the role of SMRs as a technology that could potentially reorganize society, which needs to be accounted for prior to deployment. The concept of the sociotechnical imaginary also provides another way of considering how SMRs both shape and are shaped by national imperatives for energy production and markets.",
keywords = "energy production, nuclear energy, nuclear technology, sociotechnical system",
author = "Jennifer Richter",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1109/ETHICS.2014.6893449",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781479949922",
booktitle = "2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Small modular reactors

T2 - The future of nuclear energy?

AU - Richter, Jennifer

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are being explored by the NRC and DOE as a means of producing nuclear energy on a smaller scale. Because of their modularity, they are presumed to be both less costly and more efficient to produce. This paper describes the historical context of SMRs, as well as potential issues relating to the social context of SMRs if they are deployed in society on different scales, from the local to the national and international. Understanding SMRs as sociotechnical systems allows for different conception of the role of SMRs as a technology that could potentially reorganize society, which needs to be accounted for prior to deployment. The concept of the sociotechnical imaginary also provides another way of considering how SMRs both shape and are shaped by national imperatives for energy production and markets.

AB - Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are being explored by the NRC and DOE as a means of producing nuclear energy on a smaller scale. Because of their modularity, they are presumed to be both less costly and more efficient to produce. This paper describes the historical context of SMRs, as well as potential issues relating to the social context of SMRs if they are deployed in society on different scales, from the local to the national and international. Understanding SMRs as sociotechnical systems allows for different conception of the role of SMRs as a technology that could potentially reorganize society, which needs to be accounted for prior to deployment. The concept of the sociotechnical imaginary also provides another way of considering how SMRs both shape and are shaped by national imperatives for energy production and markets.

KW - energy production

KW - nuclear energy

KW - nuclear technology

KW - sociotechnical system

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84929249273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84929249273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/ETHICS.2014.6893449

DO - 10.1109/ETHICS.2014.6893449

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781479949922

BT - 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Science, Technology and Engineering, ETHICS 2014

PB - Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.

ER -