Slip in the 1857 and earlier large earthquakes along the Carrizo Plain, San Andreas Fault

Olaf Zielke, Ramon Arrowsmith, Lisa Grant Ludwig, Sinan O. Akçiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

175 Scopus citations

Abstract

The moment magnitude (Mw) 7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857, with a ∼350-kilometer-long surface rupture, was the most recent major earthquake along the south-central San Andreas Fault, California. Based on previous measurements of its surface slip distribution, rupture along the ∼60-kilometer-long Carrizo segment was thought to control the recurrence of 1857-like earthquakes. New high-resolution topographic data show that the average slip along the Carrizo segment during the 1857 event was 5.3 ± 1.4 meters, eliminating the core assumption for a linkage between Carrizo segment rupture and recurrence of major earthquakes along the south-central San Andreas Fault. Earthquake slip along the Carrizo segment may recur in earthquake clusters with cumulative slip of ∼5 meters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1119-1122
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume327
Issue number5969
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 26 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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