Sleepiness, quality of life, and sleep maintenance in REM versus non-REM sleep-disordered breathing

Hassan A. Chami, Carol M. Baldwin, Angela Silverman, Ying Zhang, David Rapoport, Naresh M. Punjabi, Daniel J. Gottlieb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Rationale: The impact of REM-predominant sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) on sleepiness, quality of life (QOL), and sleep maintenance is uncertain. Objective: To evaluate the association of SDB during REM sleep with daytime sleepiness, health-related QOL, and difficulty maintaining sleep, in comparison to their association with SDB during non-REM sleep in a community-based cohort. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of 5,649 Sleep Heart Health Study participants (mean age 62.5 [SD = 10.9], 52.6% women, 22.6% ethnic minorities). SDB during REM and non-REM sleep was quantified using polysomnographically derived apnea-hypopnea index in REM (AHIREM) and non-REM (AHINREM) sleep. Sleepiness, sleep maintenance, and QOL were respectively quantified using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Sleep Heart Health Study Sleep Habit Questionnaire, and the physical and mental composites scales of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF)-36. Measurements and Main Results: AHIREM was not associated with the ESS scores or the physical and mental components scales scores of the SF-36 after adjusting for demographics, body mass index, and AHINREM. AHIREM was not associated with frequent difficulty maintaining sleep or early awakening from sleep. AHINREM was associated with the ESS score (β = 0.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16 to 0.34) and the physical (β = -0.12; 95% CI, -0.42 to -0.01) and mental (β = -0.20; 95% CI, -0.20 to -0.01) components scores of the SF-36 adjusting for demographics, body mass index, and AHIREM. Conclusions: In a community-based sample of middle-aged and older adults, REM-predominant SDB is not independently associated with daytime sleepiness, impaired health-related QOL, or self-reported sleep disruption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)997-1002
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume181
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

Fingerprint

Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Sleep
Maintenance
Quality of Life
Apnea
REM Sleep
Confidence Intervals
Body Mass Index
Demography
Health
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Habits
Cross-Sectional Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Hypersomnia
  • REM
  • Sleep
  • Sleep apnea syndromes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Chami, H. A., Baldwin, C. M., Silverman, A., Zhang, Y., Rapoport, D., Punjabi, N. M., & Gottlieb, D. J. (2010). Sleepiness, quality of life, and sleep maintenance in REM versus non-REM sleep-disordered breathing. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 181(9), 997-1002. https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200908-1304OC

Sleepiness, quality of life, and sleep maintenance in REM versus non-REM sleep-disordered breathing. / Chami, Hassan A.; Baldwin, Carol M.; Silverman, Angela; Zhang, Ying; Rapoport, David; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 181, No. 9, 01.05.2010, p. 997-1002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chami, Hassan A. ; Baldwin, Carol M. ; Silverman, Angela ; Zhang, Ying ; Rapoport, David ; Punjabi, Naresh M. ; Gottlieb, Daniel J. / Sleepiness, quality of life, and sleep maintenance in REM versus non-REM sleep-disordered breathing. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 181, No. 9. pp. 997-1002.
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abstract = "Rationale: The impact of REM-predominant sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) on sleepiness, quality of life (QOL), and sleep maintenance is uncertain. Objective: To evaluate the association of SDB during REM sleep with daytime sleepiness, health-related QOL, and difficulty maintaining sleep, in comparison to their association with SDB during non-REM sleep in a community-based cohort. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of 5,649 Sleep Heart Health Study participants (mean age 62.5 [SD = 10.9], 52.6{\%} women, 22.6{\%} ethnic minorities). SDB during REM and non-REM sleep was quantified using polysomnographically derived apnea-hypopnea index in REM (AHIREM) and non-REM (AHINREM) sleep. Sleepiness, sleep maintenance, and QOL were respectively quantified using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Sleep Heart Health Study Sleep Habit Questionnaire, and the physical and mental composites scales of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF)-36. Measurements and Main Results: AHIREM was not associated with the ESS scores or the physical and mental components scales scores of the SF-36 after adjusting for demographics, body mass index, and AHINREM. AHIREM was not associated with frequent difficulty maintaining sleep or early awakening from sleep. AHINREM was associated with the ESS score (β = 0.25; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.16 to 0.34) and the physical (β = -0.12; 95{\%} CI, -0.42 to -0.01) and mental (β = -0.20; 95{\%} CI, -0.20 to -0.01) components scores of the SF-36 adjusting for demographics, body mass index, and AHIREM. Conclusions: In a community-based sample of middle-aged and older adults, REM-predominant SDB is not independently associated with daytime sleepiness, impaired health-related QOL, or self-reported sleep disruption.",
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AU - Rapoport, David

AU - Punjabi, Naresh M.

AU - Gottlieb, Daniel J.

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