Sleep problems predict cortisol reactivity to stress in urban adolescents

Sylvie Mrug, Anna Tyson, Bulent Turan, Douglas A. Granger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the role of sleep problems and sleep duration on stress-related HPA axis reactivity among urban, low income adolescents. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36years; 50% male; 95% African American) and their parents provided information on adolescents' sleep problems and sleep quantity. Adolescents completed a standardized social stress test in the laboratory (the Trier Social Stress Test; TSST). Saliva samples collected before and after the TSST yielded measures of cortisol pre-test, 15min post-test, and 55min post-test, as well as overall cortisol secretion and its increase (AUCG and AUCI). More sleep problems and longer sleep duration predicted higher cortisol reactivity to the TSST, particularly among females. Self-reports of sleep were more consistently related to stress-related cortisol reactivity than parent reports. Sleep problems and longer sleep duration may place adolescents at risk for HPA axis hyper-reactivity to stress, contributing to academic, behavioral and health problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-101
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume155
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Hydrocortisone
Sleep
Exercise Test
Cortisol
Reactivity
Saliva
African Americans
Self Report
Parents
Health

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Cortisol
  • Sleep
  • Stress reactivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Philosophy

Cite this

Sleep problems predict cortisol reactivity to stress in urban adolescents. / Mrug, Sylvie; Tyson, Anna; Turan, Bulent; Granger, Douglas A.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 155, 01.03.2016, p. 95-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mrug, Sylvie ; Tyson, Anna ; Turan, Bulent ; Granger, Douglas A. / Sleep problems predict cortisol reactivity to stress in urban adolescents. In: Physiology and Behavior. 2016 ; Vol. 155. pp. 95-101.
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