Single women's labor supply elasticities: Trends and policy implications

Kelly Bishop, Bradley Heim, Kata Mihaly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper uses CPS data to examine changes in single women's labor supply elasticities in recent decades. Specifically, the authors investigate trends in how single women's hours of work and labor force participation rates responded to both wages and income over the years 1979-2003. Results from the base specification suggest that over the observation period, hours wage elasticities decreased by 82%, participation wage elasticities by 36%, and participation income elasticities by 57%. These results imply that changes in tax policy had a much larger effect on the labor supply and labor force participation behavior of women in this subpopulation in the early 1980s than in recent years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-168
Number of pages23
JournalIndustrial and Labor Relations Review
Volume63
Issue number1
StatePublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Elasticity
Wages
Personnel
Taxation
Specifications
Labor supply elasticity
Policy implications
Participation
Labor force participation
Wage elasticity
Labor supply
Workforce
Participation rate
Hours of work
Income elasticity
Income
Tax policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Single women's labor supply elasticities : Trends and policy implications. / Bishop, Kelly; Heim, Bradley; Mihaly, Kata.

In: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 63, No. 1, 10.2009, p. 146-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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