Single cell battery charger for portable electronic devices in developing countries

Nathan Johnson, Michael Granato

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Many household electronic devices-flashlights, stereos, radios-require AA, AAA, C, and D size batteries. These batteries are often disposable in remote areas of the world that lack access to grid electricity. In parts of the globe, disposable batteries can account for over 50% of household energy expenditures and amount to 25 or more batteries disposed of per person per year. This amounts to more than 25,000 batteries annually for a village of 1000 people. Solutions to this problem can address economic and environmental concerns. Replacing disposable batteries with rechargeable batteries maintained by a local entrepreneur is one business-driven method to reduce environmental waste and household energy expenditures. This study evaluates technical options for providing rechargeable batteries to a decentralized population, and introduces a prototype portable charging kit that addresses the techno-economic requirements of charging batteries, delivering batteries at a reasonable cost to consumers, providing a profit margin for local entrepreneurs, and allowing for portability during travel between villages or refugee camps. The unit includes a solar PV power source, a lead-acid battery for intermediate energy storage, a battery charger equipped with single cell batteries, a charge controller to manage power flow, and a protective suitcase to house the equipment.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
    PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
    Volume2A
    ISBN (Print)9780791846315
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2014
    EventASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014 - Buffalo, United States
    Duration: Aug 17 2014Aug 20 2014

    Other

    OtherASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014
    CountryUnited States
    CityBuffalo
    Period8/17/148/20/14

    Fingerprint

    Secondary batteries
    Developing Countries
    Developing countries
    Battery
    Flashlights
    Electronics
    Charging (batteries)
    Economics
    Lead acid batteries
    Radio receivers
    Cell
    Energy storage
    Solar energy
    Profitability
    Electricity
    Controllers
    Costs
    Industry
    Energy Metabolism
    Globe

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
    • Computer Science Applications
    • Modeling and Simulation

    Cite this

    Johnson, N., & Granato, M. (2014). Single cell battery charger for portable electronic devices in developing countries. In Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference (Vol. 2A). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2014-35457

    Single cell battery charger for portable electronic devices in developing countries. / Johnson, Nathan; Granato, Michael.

    Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 2A American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2014.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Johnson, N & Granato, M 2014, Single cell battery charger for portable electronic devices in developing countries. in Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. vol. 2A, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014, Buffalo, United States, 8/17/14. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2014-35457
    Johnson N, Granato M. Single cell battery charger for portable electronic devices in developing countries. In Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 2A. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2014 https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2014-35457
    Johnson, Nathan ; Granato, Michael. / Single cell battery charger for portable electronic devices in developing countries. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 2A American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2014.
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