Simple spike firing in the posterior lateral cerebellar cortex of Macaque Mulatta was correlated with success-failure during a visually guided reaching task.

Bradley Greger, Scott Norris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Evidence has been accumulating which supports a role for the cerebellum in motor learning. Motor learning is though to be mediated by complex spikes acting as an error signal, which when firing in conjunction with simple spike activity modify synapses between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells. We studied the activity of neurons in the posterior lateral cerebellar cortex of macaques that were performing reaches to visual targets. We found that simple spike firing in many of these neurons was modulated by whether the monkey successfully hit the target or not. The success-failure modulation was present for reaches using either arm and could persist for several hundred milliseconds into a period when the monkey was constrained from moving its arms. This temporally extended success-failure activity could interact with complex spike firing in order to enhance learning, particularly when the motor command is temporally separated from sensory feedback.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)660-665
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental brain research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Expérimentation cérébrale
Volume167
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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