Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks

Paulo Shakarian, J. Kenneth Wickiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We study the behavior of pathogens on host protein networks for humans and Arabidopsis - noting striking similarities. Specifically, we preform k-shell decomposition analysis on these networks - which groups the proteins into various "shells" based on network structure. We observe that shells with a higher average degree are more highly targeted (with a power-law relationship) and that highly targeted nodes lie in shells closer to the inner-core of the network. Additionally, we also note that the inner core of the network is significantly under-targeted. We show that these core proteins may have a role in intra-cellular communication and hypothesize that they are less attacked to ensure survival of the host. This may explain why certain high-degree proteins are not significantly attacked.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere45154
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 21 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Pathogens
Arabidopsis
Arabidopsis thaliana
pathogens
Proteins
proteins
Cellular radio systems
Communication
Decomposition
degradation
Survival
Homo sapiens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks. / Shakarian, Paulo; Wickiser, J. Kenneth.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 9, e45154, 21.09.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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