Silicide/polysilicon layer formation using dynamic recoil mixing

Michael Kozicki, J. M. Robertson, H. Kheyrandish, A. E. Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The trend in silicon MOS ICs has been toward higher levels of integration. The implied increase in component packing density has led to decreasing lateral and vertical dimensions within the circuits. However, reduced cross-sectional-doped polysilicon tracks have unacceptably high resistances and this results in increased signal propagation delays in gates and gate-level interconnections. To overcome this problem, various silicide structures have been proposed. The polycide structure, which combines a polysilicon base with a silicide 'shunt', is the most acceptable structure for VLSI technology as it combines the advantages of the well-characterized SiO2/poly-Si interface with a thermally stable, low-resistance silicide (2). The lowest resistivity polycide layers are generally formed by depositing metal on polysilicon and then heating the layers to alloy interdiffusion. In this paper, we present an alternative technique which allows thin polycide structures to be fabricated without the problems associated with native oxide diffusion barriers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)873-875
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the Electrochemical Society
Volume136
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1989

Fingerprint

Polysilicon
packing density
low resistance
shunts
high resistance
very large scale integration
trends
electrical resistivity
heating
oxides
propagation
Diffusion barriers
silicon
Silicon
metals
Oxides
Metals
Heating
Networks (circuits)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrochemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Surfaces and Interfaces

Cite this

Kozicki, M., Robertson, J. M., Kheyrandish, H., & Hill, A. E. (1989). Silicide/polysilicon layer formation using dynamic recoil mixing. Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 136(3), 873-875.

Silicide/polysilicon layer formation using dynamic recoil mixing. / Kozicki, Michael; Robertson, J. M.; Kheyrandish, H.; Hill, A. E.

In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, Vol. 136, No. 3, 03.1989, p. 873-875.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kozicki, M, Robertson, JM, Kheyrandish, H & Hill, AE 1989, 'Silicide/polysilicon layer formation using dynamic recoil mixing', Journal of the Electrochemical Society, vol. 136, no. 3, pp. 873-875.
Kozicki, Michael ; Robertson, J. M. ; Kheyrandish, H. ; Hill, A. E. / Silicide/polysilicon layer formation using dynamic recoil mixing. In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society. 1989 ; Vol. 136, No. 3. pp. 873-875.
@article{f98a2353bb40488aae28285c4a42e9a6,
title = "Silicide/polysilicon layer formation using dynamic recoil mixing",
abstract = "The trend in silicon MOS ICs has been toward higher levels of integration. The implied increase in component packing density has led to decreasing lateral and vertical dimensions within the circuits. However, reduced cross-sectional-doped polysilicon tracks have unacceptably high resistances and this results in increased signal propagation delays in gates and gate-level interconnections. To overcome this problem, various silicide structures have been proposed. The polycide structure, which combines a polysilicon base with a silicide 'shunt', is the most acceptable structure for VLSI technology as it combines the advantages of the well-characterized SiO2/poly-Si interface with a thermally stable, low-resistance silicide (2). The lowest resistivity polycide layers are generally formed by depositing metal on polysilicon and then heating the layers to alloy interdiffusion. In this paper, we present an alternative technique which allows thin polycide structures to be fabricated without the problems associated with native oxide diffusion barriers.",
author = "Michael Kozicki and Robertson, {J. M.} and H. Kheyrandish and Hill, {A. E.}",
year = "1989",
month = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "136",
pages = "873--875",
journal = "Journal of the Electrochemical Society",
issn = "0013-4651",
publisher = "Electrochemical Society, Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Silicide/polysilicon layer formation using dynamic recoil mixing

AU - Kozicki, Michael

AU - Robertson, J. M.

AU - Kheyrandish, H.

AU - Hill, A. E.

PY - 1989/3

Y1 - 1989/3

N2 - The trend in silicon MOS ICs has been toward higher levels of integration. The implied increase in component packing density has led to decreasing lateral and vertical dimensions within the circuits. However, reduced cross-sectional-doped polysilicon tracks have unacceptably high resistances and this results in increased signal propagation delays in gates and gate-level interconnections. To overcome this problem, various silicide structures have been proposed. The polycide structure, which combines a polysilicon base with a silicide 'shunt', is the most acceptable structure for VLSI technology as it combines the advantages of the well-characterized SiO2/poly-Si interface with a thermally stable, low-resistance silicide (2). The lowest resistivity polycide layers are generally formed by depositing metal on polysilicon and then heating the layers to alloy interdiffusion. In this paper, we present an alternative technique which allows thin polycide structures to be fabricated without the problems associated with native oxide diffusion barriers.

AB - The trend in silicon MOS ICs has been toward higher levels of integration. The implied increase in component packing density has led to decreasing lateral and vertical dimensions within the circuits. However, reduced cross-sectional-doped polysilicon tracks have unacceptably high resistances and this results in increased signal propagation delays in gates and gate-level interconnections. To overcome this problem, various silicide structures have been proposed. The polycide structure, which combines a polysilicon base with a silicide 'shunt', is the most acceptable structure for VLSI technology as it combines the advantages of the well-characterized SiO2/poly-Si interface with a thermally stable, low-resistance silicide (2). The lowest resistivity polycide layers are generally formed by depositing metal on polysilicon and then heating the layers to alloy interdiffusion. In this paper, we present an alternative technique which allows thin polycide structures to be fabricated without the problems associated with native oxide diffusion barriers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024620742&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024620742&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 136

SP - 873

EP - 875

JO - Journal of the Electrochemical Society

JF - Journal of the Electrochemical Society

SN - 0013-4651

IS - 3

ER -