Abstract

Pores or channels with diameters in the range of nanometers up to micrometers can be used as Coulter counting apertures to detect particles and organic molecules such as proteins. Coulter counting is performed by applying a constant potential across a nano- or micropore while recording the drop in ionic current upon passage of a molecule. Looking at the shape and duration of these current pulses enables us to estimate the size as well as the concentration of these molecules. Discrimination between different analytes can be performed by extracting appropriate features from the Coulter signals (events) and using them for classification. The challenge in being able to identify particular analytes is that a drop in current can also be caused by a molecule bouncing off the pore wall rather than moving through the micropore. Such drops are called nonevents and can be discriminated from the events using Support Vector Machines. In this paper, we consider the amplitude of the current drop and the duration of the current pulse as features to determine if an event occurred. The proposed approach uses the Dirichlet process mixture model to cluster the data in the feature domain as the type of the events in the signal record is unknown. Results obtained show that the Dirichlet process mixture model accurately finds the types of events and their count for each signal record.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFinal Program and Abstract Book - 4th International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing, ISCCSP 2010
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event4th International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing, ISCCSP-2010 - Limassol, Cyprus
Duration: Mar 3 2010Mar 5 2010

Other

Other4th International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing, ISCCSP-2010
CountryCyprus
CityLimassol
Period3/3/103/5/10

Fingerprint

Signal processing
Molecules
Sensors
Nanopores
Support vector machines
Proteins

Keywords

  • Clustering
  • Dirichlet process mixture model
  • Feature extraction
  • Silicon pore
  • Wavelet transforms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Signal Processing
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Sattigeri, P., Thiagarajan, J. J., Ramamurthy, K. N., Konnanath, B., Mathew, T., Spanias, A., ... Phillips, S. (2010). Signal processing for biologically inspired sensors. In Final Program and Abstract Book - 4th International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing, ISCCSP 2010 [5463424] https://doi.org/10.1109/ISCCSP.2010.5463424

Signal processing for biologically inspired sensors. / Sattigeri, Prasanna; Thiagarajan, J. J.; Ramamurthy, K. N.; Konnanath, B.; Mathew, T.; Spanias, Andreas; Goryll, Michael; Thornton, Trevor; Prasad, S.; Phillips, Stephen.

Final Program and Abstract Book - 4th International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing, ISCCSP 2010. 2010. 5463424.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Sattigeri, P, Thiagarajan, JJ, Ramamurthy, KN, Konnanath, B, Mathew, T, Spanias, A, Goryll, M, Thornton, T, Prasad, S & Phillips, S 2010, Signal processing for biologically inspired sensors. in Final Program and Abstract Book - 4th International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing, ISCCSP 2010., 5463424, 4th International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing, ISCCSP-2010, Limassol, Cyprus, 3/3/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISCCSP.2010.5463424
Sattigeri P, Thiagarajan JJ, Ramamurthy KN, Konnanath B, Mathew T, Spanias A et al. Signal processing for biologically inspired sensors. In Final Program and Abstract Book - 4th International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing, ISCCSP 2010. 2010. 5463424 https://doi.org/10.1109/ISCCSP.2010.5463424
Sattigeri, Prasanna ; Thiagarajan, J. J. ; Ramamurthy, K. N. ; Konnanath, B. ; Mathew, T. ; Spanias, Andreas ; Goryll, Michael ; Thornton, Trevor ; Prasad, S. ; Phillips, Stephen. / Signal processing for biologically inspired sensors. Final Program and Abstract Book - 4th International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing, ISCCSP 2010. 2010.
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