Shopping [for] power

How adult literacy learners negotiate the marketplace

Julie L. Ozanne, Natalie Ross Adkins, Jennifer Sandlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little empirical evidence exists on how adult literacy learners act as consumers. Yet, adult literacy programs often employ a "functional" approach to consumer education and assume that adult learners are deficient in consumer skills. Data from a qualitative study of the consumer behaviors of adult literacy learners are used to explore how adult learners negotiate the marketplace. The findings challenge the validity of a functional model and support the conceptualization of consumer literacy as a social practice, which includes reading and writing skills, personal and social skills, and the ability to manage the stigma of low literacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-268
Number of pages18
JournalAdult Education Quarterly
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

literacy
consumer education
consumption behavior
ability
evidence

Keywords

  • Adult literacy
  • Consumer literacy
  • Coping behaviors
  • Stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Shopping [for] power : How adult literacy learners negotiate the marketplace. / Ozanne, Julie L.; Adkins, Natalie Ross; Sandlin, Jennifer.

In: Adult Education Quarterly, Vol. 55, No. 4, 08.2005, p. 251-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ozanne, Julie L. ; Adkins, Natalie Ross ; Sandlin, Jennifer. / Shopping [for] power : How adult literacy learners negotiate the marketplace. In: Adult Education Quarterly. 2005 ; Vol. 55, No. 4. pp. 251-268.
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