"She was family": Women of color and animal-human connections

Christina Risley-Curtiss, Lynn Holley, Tracy Cruickshank, Jill Porcelli, Clare Rhoads, Denise N A Bacchus, Soma Nyakoe, Sharon B. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most families with companion animals regard them as family members, and affectionate relationships with pets can enhance health. Research suggests that these relationships are complicated and vary, depending on many factors, including ethnicity, but there has been little research on animal-human relationships in communities of color in the United States. This qualitative study explored beliefs about and experiences with companion animals of women of color. A central theme that emerged was the reciprocity that existed in women's relationships with their animals. A model for understanding multiple influences on women's views about animals and implications for research and practice are offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-447
Number of pages15
JournalAffilia - Journal of Women and Social Work
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

Keywords

  • Companion animals
  • Ethnic diversity
  • Human-animal bond
  • Women of color

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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    Risley-Curtiss, C., Holley, L., Cruickshank, T., Porcelli, J., Rhoads, C., Bacchus, D. N. A., Nyakoe, S., & Murphy, S. B. (2006). "She was family": Women of color and animal-human connections. Affilia - Journal of Women and Social Work, 21(4), 433-447. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886109906292314