“She Posted It on Facebook”

Mexican American Adolescents’ Experiences With Technology and Romantic Relationship Conflict

Heidi Adams Rueda, Megan Lindsay, Lela Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined experiences with technology and dating conflict among Mexican American (MA) adolescents (ages 15-17 years) using mixed qualitative methodologies. Focus groups, divided by three levels of acculturation and gender (N = 20), and videotaped observations of couples (N = 34), found that technology (i.e., cell phones, social media) afforded adolescents increased visibility of their partners’ day-to-day peer interactions. Feelings of romantic jealousy resulted in text message harassment and the expectation of immediate technology-facilitated contact. Females were more flirtatious as well as emotionally affected by jealousy resulting from social media sites, and males set rules regarding other-sex texting. Social media was particularly salient among more highly acculturated youth. Online spaces offered an opportunity for outside parties to observe unhealthy relationships and to offer support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-445
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Adolescent Research
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 12 2015

Fingerprint

Social Media
facebook
social media
Jealousy
Text Messaging
jealousy
adolescent
Technology
Acculturation
experience
Cell Phones
cell phone
acculturation
Focus Groups
Emotions
contact
gender
methodology
interaction
Conflict (Psychology)

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • Latinos
  • qualitative methods
  • romantic relationships
  • technology
  • violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

“She Posted It on Facebook” : Mexican American Adolescents’ Experiences With Technology and Romantic Relationship Conflict. / Rueda, Heidi Adams; Lindsay, Megan; Williams, Lela.

In: Journal of Adolescent Research, Vol. 30, No. 4, 12.07.2015, p. 419-445.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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