Sexual Activity and Contraceptive Use among Children Entering Out-of-Home Care

Christina Risley-Curtiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored the prevalence of reported sexual activity of a cohort of children entering out-of-home care and the ability of selected of factors to explain reported sexual activity and use or nonuse of contraceptives. It found that children as young as age 8 reported sexual activity, and that more than one-third of the children age 8 to 18 reported being sexually active. Of those who were sexually active, more than one-third were not using contraceptives. Using logistic regression, five variables are identified as having importance in explaining sexual activity. Two variables had some limited ability to explain contraceptive use. Implications of these findings are discussed and suggestions for policy and practice are made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-499
Number of pages25
JournalChild Welfare
Volume76
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1997

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Home Care Services
Contraceptive Agents
home care
contraceptive
Sexual Behavior
Aptitude
ability
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
logistics
regression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Sexual Activity and Contraceptive Use among Children Entering Out-of-Home Care. / Risley-Curtiss, Christina.

In: Child Welfare, Vol. 76, No. 4, 1997, p. 475-499.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Risley-Curtiss, Christina. / Sexual Activity and Contraceptive Use among Children Entering Out-of-Home Care. In: Child Welfare. 1997 ; Vol. 76, No. 4. pp. 475-499.
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