Sex, Race, and Place: Taking an Intersectional Approach to Understanding Neighborhood-Level Violent Crime across Race and Sex

Lyndsay N. Boggess, Ráchael A. Powers, Alyssa Chamberlain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: We draw upon theories of social disorganization, strain, and subculture of violence to examine how sex and race/ethnicity intersect to inform nonlethal violent offending at the macrolevel. Methods: Using neighborhood-level incidents, we examine (1) the structural correlates of male and female nonlethal violence and (2) whether ecological conditions have variable impacts on the prevalence of White, Black, and Latino male and female offenses above and beyond differential exposure to disadvantage. We use multivariate negative binomial regression within a structural equation modeling framework which allows for the examination of the same set of indicator variables on more than one dependent variable simultaneously while accounting for covariance between the dependent variables. Results: We find few significant differences in the salience of disadvantage on female and male violence across race and ethnicity although some differences emerge for White men and women. Structural factors are largely sex invariant within race and ethnicity. Conclusions: Despite expectations that disadvantage would have differential effects across sex and race/ethnicity, we uncover only minor differences. This suggests that structural effects are more invariant than variant across subgroups and highlights the importance of investigating both similarities and differences when examining neighborhood structure, intersectionality, and criminal behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Research in Crime and Delinquency
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • concentrated disadvantage
  • female offending
  • neighborhood effects
  • racial invariance
  • violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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