Service utilization in high-crime communities: Consumer views on supports and barriers

James Williams, Robert Pierce, Nioka S. Young, Richard A. Van Dorn

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study uses qualitative methods to investigate perceived supports and barriers to social and health service utilization among minorities residing in high-crime and violent communities. Focus groups were conducted with African Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanics/Latinos (N=64) who reside in these communities within a moderately sized Midwestern city. Both convergent and divergent themes were identified across the groups. Implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-417
Number of pages9
JournalFamilies in Society
Volume82
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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utilization
offense
qualitative method
mobile social services
community
health service
Group
minority
American

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Service utilization in high-crime communities : Consumer views on supports and barriers. / Williams, James; Pierce, Robert; Young, Nioka S.; Van Dorn, Richard A.

In: Families in Society, Vol. 82, No. 4, 01.01.2001, p. 409-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Williams, James ; Pierce, Robert ; Young, Nioka S. ; Van Dorn, Richard A. / Service utilization in high-crime communities : Consumer views on supports and barriers. In: Families in Society. 2001 ; Vol. 82, No. 4. pp. 409-417.
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