Semiconductor device scaling: Physics, transport, and the role of nanowires

D. K. Ferry, R. Akis, A. Cummings, M. J. Gilbert, S. M. Ramey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanoelectronics generally refers to nanometer scale devices, and to circuits and architectures which are composed of these devices. Continued scaling of the devices into the nanometer range leads to enhanced information processing systems. Generally, this scaling has arisen from three major sources, one of which is reduction of the physical gate length of individual transistors. Until recently, this has also allowed an increase in the clock speed of the chip, but power considerations have halted this to levels around 4 GHz in Si. Indeed, there are indications that scaling itself may be finished by the end of this decade. There are now pushes to seek alternative materials for nano-devices that may supplement the Si CMOS in a manner that allows both higher speeds and lower power. In this paper, I will cover some of the impending limitations, and discuss some alternative approaches that may signal continued evolution of integrated circuits beyond the end of the decade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006
Pages415-418
Number of pages4
Volume2
StatePublished - 2006
Event2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006 - Cincinnati, OH, United States
Duration: Jun 17 2006Jun 20 2006

Other

Other2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006
CountryUnited States
CityCincinnati, OH
Period6/17/066/20/06

Fingerprint

Semiconductor devices
Nanowires
Physics
Nanoelectronics
Integrated circuits
Clocks
Transistors
Networks (circuits)

Keywords

  • Ballistic transport
  • Discrete impurities
  • Nanoelectronics
  • Nanowires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Ferry, D. K., Akis, R., Cummings, A., Gilbert, M. J., & Ramey, S. M. (2006). Semiconductor device scaling: Physics, transport, and the role of nanowires. In 2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006 (Vol. 2, pp. 415-418). [1717125]

Semiconductor device scaling : Physics, transport, and the role of nanowires. / Ferry, D. K.; Akis, R.; Cummings, A.; Gilbert, M. J.; Ramey, S. M.

2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006. Vol. 2 2006. p. 415-418 1717125.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ferry, DK, Akis, R, Cummings, A, Gilbert, MJ & Ramey, SM 2006, Semiconductor device scaling: Physics, transport, and the role of nanowires. in 2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006. vol. 2, 1717125, pp. 415-418, 2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006, Cincinnati, OH, United States, 6/17/06.
Ferry DK, Akis R, Cummings A, Gilbert MJ, Ramey SM. Semiconductor device scaling: Physics, transport, and the role of nanowires. In 2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006. Vol. 2. 2006. p. 415-418. 1717125
Ferry, D. K. ; Akis, R. ; Cummings, A. ; Gilbert, M. J. ; Ramey, S. M. / Semiconductor device scaling : Physics, transport, and the role of nanowires. 2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006. Vol. 2 2006. pp. 415-418
@inproceedings{c66057f473464898b27cd59589418709,
title = "Semiconductor device scaling: Physics, transport, and the role of nanowires",
abstract = "Nanoelectronics generally refers to nanometer scale devices, and to circuits and architectures which are composed of these devices. Continued scaling of the devices into the nanometer range leads to enhanced information processing systems. Generally, this scaling has arisen from three major sources, one of which is reduction of the physical gate length of individual transistors. Until recently, this has also allowed an increase in the clock speed of the chip, but power considerations have halted this to levels around 4 GHz in Si. Indeed, there are indications that scaling itself may be finished by the end of this decade. There are now pushes to seek alternative materials for nano-devices that may supplement the Si CMOS in a manner that allows both higher speeds and lower power. In this paper, I will cover some of the impending limitations, and discuss some alternative approaches that may signal continued evolution of integrated circuits beyond the end of the decade.",
keywords = "Ballistic transport, Discrete impurities, Nanoelectronics, Nanowires",
author = "Ferry, {D. K.} and R. Akis and A. Cummings and Gilbert, {M. J.} and Ramey, {S. M.}",
year = "2006",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "1424400783",
volume = "2",
pages = "415--418",
booktitle = "2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Semiconductor device scaling

T2 - Physics, transport, and the role of nanowires

AU - Ferry, D. K.

AU - Akis, R.

AU - Cummings, A.

AU - Gilbert, M. J.

AU - Ramey, S. M.

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Nanoelectronics generally refers to nanometer scale devices, and to circuits and architectures which are composed of these devices. Continued scaling of the devices into the nanometer range leads to enhanced information processing systems. Generally, this scaling has arisen from three major sources, one of which is reduction of the physical gate length of individual transistors. Until recently, this has also allowed an increase in the clock speed of the chip, but power considerations have halted this to levels around 4 GHz in Si. Indeed, there are indications that scaling itself may be finished by the end of this decade. There are now pushes to seek alternative materials for nano-devices that may supplement the Si CMOS in a manner that allows both higher speeds and lower power. In this paper, I will cover some of the impending limitations, and discuss some alternative approaches that may signal continued evolution of integrated circuits beyond the end of the decade.

AB - Nanoelectronics generally refers to nanometer scale devices, and to circuits and architectures which are composed of these devices. Continued scaling of the devices into the nanometer range leads to enhanced information processing systems. Generally, this scaling has arisen from three major sources, one of which is reduction of the physical gate length of individual transistors. Until recently, this has also allowed an increase in the clock speed of the chip, but power considerations have halted this to levels around 4 GHz in Si. Indeed, there are indications that scaling itself may be finished by the end of this decade. There are now pushes to seek alternative materials for nano-devices that may supplement the Si CMOS in a manner that allows both higher speeds and lower power. In this paper, I will cover some of the impending limitations, and discuss some alternative approaches that may signal continued evolution of integrated circuits beyond the end of the decade.

KW - Ballistic transport

KW - Discrete impurities

KW - Nanoelectronics

KW - Nanowires

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=42549092048&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=42549092048&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:42549092048

SN - 1424400783

SN - 9781424400782

VL - 2

SP - 415

EP - 418

BT - 2006 6th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, IEEE-NANO 2006

ER -