Self-regulated strategy development for students with writing difficulties

Linda H. Mason, Karen Harris, Stephen Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Students with writing difficulties often struggle with the planning, composing, and revising skills required for effective writing. Fortunately, re-searchers have documented that explicit, interactive, scaffolded development of powerful composing strategies and strategies for self-regulating the writing process, as in Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) instruction, results in improved student performance across writing genres. In addition, SRSD has had significant andmeaningful effects among students with learning disabilities (LD) in both elementary and secondary settings. In this article, examples of SRSD instruction for planning, composing, and revision are described. Promising findings of recent research for students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are also highlighted. Finally, tips for effective classroom implementation are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-27
Number of pages8
JournalTheory into Practice
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

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development strategy
student
instruction
planning
ADHD
learning disability
genre
classroom
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Self-regulated strategy development for students with writing difficulties. / Mason, Linda H.; Harris, Karen; Graham, Stephen.

In: Theory into Practice, Vol. 50, No. 1, 12.2011, p. 20-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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