Self-rated health status and cardiorespiratory fi tness as predictors of mortality in men

Jennifer Gander, Duck Chul Lee, Xuemei Sui, James R. Hébert, Steven P. Hooker, Steven N. Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-rated health (SRH) and cardiorespiratory fitness (fitness) are independent risk factors for all-cause mortality. The purpose of this report is to examine the single and joint effects of these exposures on mortality risk. The study included 18 488 men who completed a health survey, clinical examination and a maximal exercise treadmill test during 1987-2003. Cox regression analysis was used to quantify the associations of SRH and fi tness with all-cause mortality. There were 262 deaths during 17 years of follow-up. There was a signifi cant inverse trend (ptrend <0.05) for mortality across SRH categories after adjustment for age, examination year, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, abnormal ECG, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Adjustment for fi tness attenuated the association (p value =0.09). The authors also observed an inverse association between fi tness and mortality after controlling for the same covariates and SRH (ptrend = 0.006). The combined analysis of SRH and fi tness showed that fi t men with good or excellent SRH had a 58% lower risk of mortality than their counterparts. SRH and fi tness were both associated with all-cause mortality in men. Fit men with good or excellent SRH live longer than unfi t men with poor or fair SRH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1095-1100
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume45
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Health Status
Mortality
Health
Exercise Test
Hypercholesterolemia
Health Surveys
Alcohol Drinking
Electrocardiography
Body Mass Index
Cardiovascular Diseases
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Exercise
Hypertension
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Gander, J., Lee, D. C., Sui, X., Hébert, J. R., Hooker, S. P., & Blair, S. N. (2011). Self-rated health status and cardiorespiratory fi tness as predictors of mortality in men. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 45(14), 1095-1100. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2010.079855

Self-rated health status and cardiorespiratory fi tness as predictors of mortality in men. / Gander, Jennifer; Lee, Duck Chul; Sui, Xuemei; Hébert, James R.; Hooker, Steven P.; Blair, Steven N.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 45, No. 14, 11.2011, p. 1095-1100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gander, Jennifer ; Lee, Duck Chul ; Sui, Xuemei ; Hébert, James R. ; Hooker, Steven P. ; Blair, Steven N. / Self-rated health status and cardiorespiratory fi tness as predictors of mortality in men. In: British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 45, No. 14. pp. 1095-1100.
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