Self-perceived social acceptance and peer social standing in children with aggressive-disruptive Behaviors

Dustin Pardini, Tammy D. Barry, Joan M. Barth, John E. Lochman, Karen C. Wells

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examining children's perceptions of their social acceptance in conjunction with others' ratings of their peer social standing can enhance our understanding of the heterogeneity in children exhibiting disruptive behavior problems. Using a sample of 213 youth rated in the top 31 percent of their class on aggressive-disruptive behaviors, the current study examined the interaction between children's perceptions of their social acceptance and their peer-rated social standing in predicting emotional and behavioral problems. Overall, lower peer-rated social standing was associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, academic problems, and hyperactivity/inattention. On the other hand, higher self-perceived social acceptance was associated with increased levels of peer-rated fighting at school. For children who were rated as having high social standing among their peers, poorer self-perceived social acceptance was associated with increased oppositional behaviors and conduct problems at home. In addition, children who reported lower self-perceived social acceptance exhibited increased levels of depressive symptoms, even when they were relatively well liked by their peers. The potential implications for working with subgroups of children with aggressive-disruptive behaviors are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-64
Number of pages19
JournalSocial Development
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Social Distance
aggressive behavior
acceptance
Problem Behavior
rating
Depression
interaction
school

Keywords

  • Acceptance
  • Aggression
  • Perceptions
  • Self-concept
  • Social status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Self-perceived social acceptance and peer social standing in children with aggressive-disruptive Behaviors. / Pardini, Dustin; Barry, Tammy D.; Barth, Joan M.; Lochman, John E.; Wells, Karen C.

In: Social Development, Vol. 15, No. 1, 02.2006, p. 46-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pardini, Dustin ; Barry, Tammy D. ; Barth, Joan M. ; Lochman, John E. ; Wells, Karen C. / Self-perceived social acceptance and peer social standing in children with aggressive-disruptive Behaviors. In: Social Development. 2006 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 46-64.
@article{0ba269b35ede498dbec118b16c3d27d1,
title = "Self-perceived social acceptance and peer social standing in children with aggressive-disruptive Behaviors",
abstract = "Examining children's perceptions of their social acceptance in conjunction with others' ratings of their peer social standing can enhance our understanding of the heterogeneity in children exhibiting disruptive behavior problems. Using a sample of 213 youth rated in the top 31 percent of their class on aggressive-disruptive behaviors, the current study examined the interaction between children's perceptions of their social acceptance and their peer-rated social standing in predicting emotional and behavioral problems. Overall, lower peer-rated social standing was associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, academic problems, and hyperactivity/inattention. On the other hand, higher self-perceived social acceptance was associated with increased levels of peer-rated fighting at school. For children who were rated as having high social standing among their peers, poorer self-perceived social acceptance was associated with increased oppositional behaviors and conduct problems at home. In addition, children who reported lower self-perceived social acceptance exhibited increased levels of depressive symptoms, even when they were relatively well liked by their peers. The potential implications for working with subgroups of children with aggressive-disruptive behaviors are discussed.",
keywords = "Acceptance, Aggression, Perceptions, Self-concept, Social status",
author = "Dustin Pardini and Barry, {Tammy D.} and Barth, {Joan M.} and Lochman, {John E.} and Wells, {Karen C.}",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9507.2006.00329.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "46--64",
journal = "Social Development",
issn = "0961-205X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-perceived social acceptance and peer social standing in children with aggressive-disruptive Behaviors

AU - Pardini, Dustin

AU - Barry, Tammy D.

AU - Barth, Joan M.

AU - Lochman, John E.

AU - Wells, Karen C.

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - Examining children's perceptions of their social acceptance in conjunction with others' ratings of their peer social standing can enhance our understanding of the heterogeneity in children exhibiting disruptive behavior problems. Using a sample of 213 youth rated in the top 31 percent of their class on aggressive-disruptive behaviors, the current study examined the interaction between children's perceptions of their social acceptance and their peer-rated social standing in predicting emotional and behavioral problems. Overall, lower peer-rated social standing was associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, academic problems, and hyperactivity/inattention. On the other hand, higher self-perceived social acceptance was associated with increased levels of peer-rated fighting at school. For children who were rated as having high social standing among their peers, poorer self-perceived social acceptance was associated with increased oppositional behaviors and conduct problems at home. In addition, children who reported lower self-perceived social acceptance exhibited increased levels of depressive symptoms, even when they were relatively well liked by their peers. The potential implications for working with subgroups of children with aggressive-disruptive behaviors are discussed.

AB - Examining children's perceptions of their social acceptance in conjunction with others' ratings of their peer social standing can enhance our understanding of the heterogeneity in children exhibiting disruptive behavior problems. Using a sample of 213 youth rated in the top 31 percent of their class on aggressive-disruptive behaviors, the current study examined the interaction between children's perceptions of their social acceptance and their peer-rated social standing in predicting emotional and behavioral problems. Overall, lower peer-rated social standing was associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, academic problems, and hyperactivity/inattention. On the other hand, higher self-perceived social acceptance was associated with increased levels of peer-rated fighting at school. For children who were rated as having high social standing among their peers, poorer self-perceived social acceptance was associated with increased oppositional behaviors and conduct problems at home. In addition, children who reported lower self-perceived social acceptance exhibited increased levels of depressive symptoms, even when they were relatively well liked by their peers. The potential implications for working with subgroups of children with aggressive-disruptive behaviors are discussed.

KW - Acceptance

KW - Aggression

KW - Perceptions

KW - Self-concept

KW - Social status

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645119760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645119760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9507.2006.00329.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9507.2006.00329.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33645119760

VL - 15

SP - 46

EP - 64

JO - Social Development

JF - Social Development

SN - 0961-205X

IS - 1

ER -