Self-efficacy theory and the theory of planned behavior: Teaching physically active physical education classes

Jeffrey J. Martin, Pamela Kulinna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of our investigation was to examine determinants of teachers' intentions to teach physically active physical education classes (i.e., spend at least 50% of class time with the students engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity). Based on the theory of planned behavior, a model was examined hypothesizing that teachers' intentions were determined by subjective norm, attitude, and perceived behavioral control. Grounded in self-efficacy theory, it was hypothesized that program goal importance and hierarchical and barrier self-efficacy would also predict intention. Using a series of hierarchical regression analyses, the theory of planned behavior was supported by accounting for 59% of the variance in intention due to attitude, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norm. Self-efficacy theory based variables received minimal support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-297
Number of pages10
JournalResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004

Keywords

  • Children
  • Fitness
  • Health
  • Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Nephrology

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