SELF-EFFICACY AND CONFIDENCE: THEORETICAL DISTINCTIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR TRIAL CONSULTATION

Robert J. Cramer, Tess M.S. Neal, Stanley L. Brodsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-Efficacy Theory (SET; Bandura, 1986, 2000) has generated research and practice ramifications across areas of psychology. However, self-efficacy has yet to be assessed in a legal context. This article juxtaposes self-efficacy with self-confidence in terms of theoretical foundations and practical implications, with attention to the area of witness testimony. It is concluded that the concept of witness self-efficacy possesses thorough theoretical grounding as a potential target for witness preparation. As such, we put forth an integrated model of witness preparation featuring self-efficacy-bolstering techniques within an established witness-training framework.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-334
Number of pages16
JournalConsulting Psychology Journal
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • confidence
  • self-efficacy
  • witness preparation
  • witness testimony

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

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