Selection on a haploid genotype for discrimination learning performance: Correlation between drone honey bees (Apis mellifera) and their worker progeny (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

Shirly T. Benatar, Susan Cobey, Brian Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Successful bidirectional selection for discriminative olfactory learning is reported for drone honey bees (Apis mellifera). Learning performance was evaluated using a discrimination conditioning procedure that required drones to discriminate between an appetitively reinforced odorant and one that was followed by punishment. Selective breeding produced high- and low-learning-performance lines of worker progeny that diverged from performance of workers whose fathers were selected at random. Furthermore, we show that levels of sucrose-induced sensitization are not correlated to learning performance. These results corroborate earlier findings and further demonstrate the power of selection on a haploid (drone) genotype. In addition, this study now shows that the demonstrated differences in learning performance cannot be completely accounted for by alteration of sucrose-induced sensitization. Thus, using this technique, it may be possible to select for associative conditioning without a pleiotropic increase in sensitization. The honey bee will be ideally suited to these types of correlation analyses in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)637-652
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Insect Behavior
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

drone honey bees
Apidae
honey
Apis mellifera
bee
haplotypes
genotype
learning
Hymenoptera
drones (insects)
conditioned behavior
sucrose
conditioning
selective breeding
fathers
selection methods
odor compounds
haploidy
honey bees

Keywords

  • Apis mellifera
  • discrimination conditioning
  • haploid
  • honey bees
  • selection response
  • sensitization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

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title = "Selection on a haploid genotype for discrimination learning performance: Correlation between drone honey bees (Apis mellifera) and their worker progeny (Hymenoptera: Apidae)",
abstract = "Successful bidirectional selection for discriminative olfactory learning is reported for drone honey bees (Apis mellifera). Learning performance was evaluated using a discrimination conditioning procedure that required drones to discriminate between an appetitively reinforced odorant and one that was followed by punishment. Selective breeding produced high- and low-learning-performance lines of worker progeny that diverged from performance of workers whose fathers were selected at random. Furthermore, we show that levels of sucrose-induced sensitization are not correlated to learning performance. These results corroborate earlier findings and further demonstrate the power of selection on a haploid (drone) genotype. In addition, this study now shows that the demonstrated differences in learning performance cannot be completely accounted for by alteration of sucrose-induced sensitization. Thus, using this technique, it may be possible to select for associative conditioning without a pleiotropic increase in sensitization. The honey bee will be ideally suited to these types of correlation analyses in future studies.",
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AU - Cobey, Susan

AU - Smith, Brian

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N2 - Successful bidirectional selection for discriminative olfactory learning is reported for drone honey bees (Apis mellifera). Learning performance was evaluated using a discrimination conditioning procedure that required drones to discriminate between an appetitively reinforced odorant and one that was followed by punishment. Selective breeding produced high- and low-learning-performance lines of worker progeny that diverged from performance of workers whose fathers were selected at random. Furthermore, we show that levels of sucrose-induced sensitization are not correlated to learning performance. These results corroborate earlier findings and further demonstrate the power of selection on a haploid (drone) genotype. In addition, this study now shows that the demonstrated differences in learning performance cannot be completely accounted for by alteration of sucrose-induced sensitization. Thus, using this technique, it may be possible to select for associative conditioning without a pleiotropic increase in sensitization. The honey bee will be ideally suited to these types of correlation analyses in future studies.

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