Selection for Some, Facilitation for Others? Self-Control Theory and the Gang-Violence Relationship

Kathleen Talbot, Jeffrey T. Ward, Jodi Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although self-control theory has been thought to be entirely consistent with the gang selection model, key theoretical predictions of the general theory imply gang selection effects for those with lower self-control and gang facilitation effects for those with higher self-control. This new hypothesis is tested among a large sample of jail inmates. Results indicate that self-control did not render the gang-violence relationship spurious for the sample as a whole. Gang membership had a significantly greater impact on violent crime among those with very high self-control, but there were still statistically significant gang facilitation effects for the other three self-control groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)996-1019
Number of pages24
JournalDeviant Behavior
Volume34
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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control theory
self-control
Crime
Violence
Theoretical Models
violence
Control Groups
violent crime
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

Selection for Some, Facilitation for Others? Self-Control Theory and the Gang-Violence Relationship. / Talbot, Kathleen; Ward, Jeffrey T.; Lane, Jodi.

In: Deviant Behavior, Vol. 34, No. 12, 2013, p. 996-1019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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