Selecting indicator taxa for the quantitative assessment of biodiversity

David Pearson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seven criteria are presented that can be used to objectively test the claim that a given taxon is an ideal indicator: 1) well known and stable taxonmy; 2) well known natural history; 3) readily surveyed and manipulated; 4) higher taxa broadly distributed geographically and over a breadth of habitat types; 5) lower taxa specialized and sensitive to habitat changes; 6) patterns of biodiversity reflected in other related and unrelated taxa; and 7) potential economic importance. These criteria have different priorities depending on which of two general categories of biodiversity the indicator taxon is to be used. Monitoring places an emphasis on sensitivity to habitat change, and inventory places an emphasis on systematics. An index is suggested by which the results of selecting an indicator taxon can be more accurately communicated. -from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-79
Number of pages5
JournalUnknown Journal
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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Biodiversity
Ecosystem
biodiversity
habitat
Natural History
habitat type
Economics
Monitoring
Equipment and Supplies
monitoring
history
economics
indicator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Selecting indicator taxa for the quantitative assessment of biodiversity. / Pearson, David.

In: Unknown Journal, 01.01.1995, p. 75-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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