Seeing Red: Disgust Reactions to Gruesome Photographs in Color (but not in Black and White) Increase Convictions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Jurors are often exposed to emotionally disturbing gruesome photographs of victims of extreme violence. Judges must determine whether the informational value of these photographs outweighs their prejudicial effect on jurors and are left to their assumptions about juror psychology to do so. The current research draws upon the affect infusion model (AIM; Forgas, 1995) to investigate the affective mechanism through which gruesome photographs might operate. A mock jury experiment presented online adults (n = 193) with murder trial evidence that included verbal descriptions of the victim's injuries and neutral photographs in all conditions. Participants were randomly assigned to view (a) only the nongruesome photographs or additional gruesome photographs of the victim in (b) color, or

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychology, Public Policy, and Law
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 30 2017

Fingerprint

Homicide
Violence
Color
Psychology
Wounds and Injuries
Research
homicide
psychology
violence
experiment
evidence
hydroquinone
Values

Keywords

  • Blame
  • Disgust
  • Emotion
  • Gruesome photographs
  • Jury decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

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title = "Seeing Red: Disgust Reactions to Gruesome Photographs in Color (but not in Black and White) Increase Convictions",
abstract = "Jurors are often exposed to emotionally disturbing gruesome photographs of victims of extreme violence. Judges must determine whether the informational value of these photographs outweighs their prejudicial effect on jurors and are left to their assumptions about juror psychology to do so. The current research draws upon the affect infusion model (AIM; Forgas, 1995) to investigate the affective mechanism through which gruesome photographs might operate. A mock jury experiment presented online adults (n = 193) with murder trial evidence that included verbal descriptions of the victim's injuries and neutral photographs in all conditions. Participants were randomly assigned to view (a) only the nongruesome photographs or additional gruesome photographs of the victim in (b) color, or",
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