Sectoral clustering and growth in American metropolitan areas

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purposes of this paper are to develop a theory of industrial clustering of information intensive industries, identify intermetropolitan clusters of sectors in the US, to test the relationship between the clustering pattern and metropolitan employment and income growth, and to interpret temporal changes in the clusters. The empirical results reported here are based on factor analyses of employment shares in 77 sectors in the 150 largest metropolitan areas in 1977 and 1986. The sectors are mainly two-digit industries. Also included are 9 auxiliary and administrative sectors and 3 government sectors. The factor analyses succeeded in identifying spatial associations among sectors. Little association was found between the location of high-order services and corporate auxiliary and administrative employment. I interpret clustering of information intensive service and manufacturing sectors as evidence of intersectoral mobility of high-skilled professionals in local labour markets. The rate of growth of per-capita income and total employment was the fastest in metropolitan areas with clusters of high-order services, state and local government activities and high-technology manufacturing. The most noteworthy temporal change in spatial associations was the emergence by 1986 of business and professional services clusters with location patterns that were distinct from other high-order services. -Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-426
Number of pages16
JournalRegional Studies
Volume25
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1991

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metropolitan area
agglomeration area
income
manufacturing
industry
high technology
manufacturing sector
tertiary sector
labor market
local government
services
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Sectoral clustering and growth in American metropolitan areas. / O'Huallachain, Breandan.

In: Regional Studies, Vol. 25, No. 3, 1991, p. 411-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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