Secretion of colony-stimulating factors by T cell clones. Role in adoptive protection against Listeria monocytogenes

D. Mitchell Magee, E. J. Wing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

CSF have been postulated to be important mediators of host defenses. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the production of CSF by Listeria-specific, T cell clones and to assess the participation of CSF in anti-listerial host resistance. Listeria-specific L3T4+, Lyt-2- T cell clones were isolated and expanded by standard techniques. The clones themselves protected mice from listerial challenge when injected intravenously, and supernatants generated from Ag-stimulated clones were protective. In order to define factors important in the protection, supernatants from the clones were assayed for CSF by several in vitro assays. Total colony-stimulating activity was measured with a bone marrow colony-forming assay. T cell clones secreted 1000 to 2000 U/ml of colony-stimulating activity after 48 hours of stimulation with specific antigen. The relative amounts of the various CSF were determined by the capacity of supernatants to support proliferation of the factor-dependent cell lines FDCP-1 and 32D cl 3 in the presence and absence of specific anti-CSF antibodies. Results showed that most of the CSF activity was due to granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF and IL-3. The role of GM-CSF in anti-listerial host resistance was assessed in two types of experiments. In one set of experiments GM-CSF activity was neutralized in the supernatants by addition of specific rabbit anti-GM-CSF antibodies. Treated and untreated supernatants were then tested for their capacity to protect nonimmune mice against listerial challenge. Neutralization of GM-CSF in the supernatants decreased the protective capacity of the supernatants by approximately 23%. In a second set of studies, the administration of recombinant murine GM-CSF was shown to protect mice from challenges of L. monocytogens. Taken together, these experiments provide evidence that CSF are important mediators of immune T cell mediated host defenses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2336-2341
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume143
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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