Second shifts and political awakenings: Divorce and the political socialization of middle-aged women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Links between personal life events (e.g., divorce) and political socialization have been understudied, particularly in midlife populations. This study examined a longitudinal sample of 98 female graduates from the University of Michigan class of 1967. Participants were divided into two groups: divorced (N = 27) and married (N = 71). T-tests and Chi-Square analyses were used to examine differences between groups for political orientation, power discontent, system blame, feminist identity, common fate, social responsibility, and political participation. Results showed that divorced women, when compared with married women, had a more liberal/radical political orientation, more system blame for gender, active commitment to feminist identity, and a sense of common fate with other women. No significant differences were found for measures of past or current political involvement. Implications for normative life events to restructure political viewpoints and attitudes are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-66
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Divorce and Remarriage
Volume47
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Fingerprint

political socialization
political attitude
divorce
event
social responsibility
political participation
wife
Group
graduate
commitment
gender

Keywords

  • Divorce
  • Divorce and midlife
  • Divorce and women
  • Political socialization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

@article{ebfdd87a4a8d45a792a3338d7fef68e9,
title = "Second shifts and political awakenings: Divorce and the political socialization of middle-aged women",
abstract = "Links between personal life events (e.g., divorce) and political socialization have been understudied, particularly in midlife populations. This study examined a longitudinal sample of 98 female graduates from the University of Michigan class of 1967. Participants were divided into two groups: divorced (N = 27) and married (N = 71). T-tests and Chi-Square analyses were used to examine differences between groups for political orientation, power discontent, system blame, feminist identity, common fate, social responsibility, and political participation. Results showed that divorced women, when compared with married women, had a more liberal/radical political orientation, more system blame for gender, active commitment to feminist identity, and a sense of common fate with other women. No significant differences were found for measures of past or current political involvement. Implications for normative life events to restructure political viewpoints and attitudes are discussed.",
keywords = "Divorce, Divorce and midlife, Divorce and women, Political socialization",
author = "Breanne Fahs",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1300/J087v47n03_03",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "43--66",
journal = "Journal of Divorce and Remarriage",
issn = "1050-2556",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Second shifts and political awakenings

T2 - Divorce and the political socialization of middle-aged women

AU - Fahs, Breanne

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Links between personal life events (e.g., divorce) and political socialization have been understudied, particularly in midlife populations. This study examined a longitudinal sample of 98 female graduates from the University of Michigan class of 1967. Participants were divided into two groups: divorced (N = 27) and married (N = 71). T-tests and Chi-Square analyses were used to examine differences between groups for political orientation, power discontent, system blame, feminist identity, common fate, social responsibility, and political participation. Results showed that divorced women, when compared with married women, had a more liberal/radical political orientation, more system blame for gender, active commitment to feminist identity, and a sense of common fate with other women. No significant differences were found for measures of past or current political involvement. Implications for normative life events to restructure political viewpoints and attitudes are discussed.

AB - Links between personal life events (e.g., divorce) and political socialization have been understudied, particularly in midlife populations. This study examined a longitudinal sample of 98 female graduates from the University of Michigan class of 1967. Participants were divided into two groups: divorced (N = 27) and married (N = 71). T-tests and Chi-Square analyses were used to examine differences between groups for political orientation, power discontent, system blame, feminist identity, common fate, social responsibility, and political participation. Results showed that divorced women, when compared with married women, had a more liberal/radical political orientation, more system blame for gender, active commitment to feminist identity, and a sense of common fate with other women. No significant differences were found for measures of past or current political involvement. Implications for normative life events to restructure political viewpoints and attitudes are discussed.

KW - Divorce

KW - Divorce and midlife

KW - Divorce and women

KW - Political socialization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548500115&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548500115&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1300/J087v47n03_03

DO - 10.1300/J087v47n03_03

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:34548500115

VL - 47

SP - 43

EP - 66

JO - Journal of Divorce and Remarriage

JF - Journal of Divorce and Remarriage

SN - 1050-2556

IS - 3-4

ER -