Seasonal variability of particle-associated organic compounds near a heavily traveled secondary road

Thomas Cahill, Thomas A. Cahill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Size-resolved aerosol samples were collected both upwind and downwind of a large secondary road in the winter and spring of 2007 to assess contributions of on-road emissions to ambient aerosols. The aerosol samples were extracted and analyzed for a wide variety of organic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkanes, sugars, and organic acids. The results showed a strong seasonal pattern where the concentrations of most compounds were higher in winter than in spring. Some of the biogenic sugars were the exception, which might be the result of a "spring blooming season." The surprising result was that the upwind site located in a residential neighborhood had very similar concentrations of most organic compounds compared to the near-roadway site. Possible reasons for the lack of differences in organic chemical concentrations between the near-road and control sites include: a large urban background concentration of aerosols superimposed on any local source; shifting wind directions that make the "downwind" site upwind during the night; and additional local sources in the residential neighborhood such as wood burning in winter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-60
Number of pages8
JournalAerosol Science and Technology
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2014

Fingerprint

Aerosols
Organic compounds
organic compound
aerosol
road
winter
sugar
spring (season)
Organic Chemicals
organic acid
alkane
wind direction
Alkanes
Organic acids
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Organic chemicals
PAH
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
particle size
Sugars

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution

Cite this

Seasonal variability of particle-associated organic compounds near a heavily traveled secondary road. / Cahill, Thomas; Cahill, Thomas A.

In: Aerosol Science and Technology, Vol. 48, No. 1, 02.01.2014, p. 53-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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