Search for meaning in long-term cancer survivors.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore search for meaning in long-term survivors of malignant melanoma and the relationship of this meaning to self-blame and well-being. The sample consisted of 31 long-term melanoma survivors who had been free of disease for 5 years or longer. Measures included the Search for Meaning scale, a single item on self-blame and the Index of Well-Being. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and t-tests. Findings revealed that 52% (n = 16) of the sample did search for meaning which resulted in an identifiable cause for their cancer and a quiet reassessment of life. Subjects indicating self-responsibility for their cancer expressed a greater meaning search than the group who did not blame self (P < 0.01). Well-being scores were not significantly related to this search for meaning. Results suggest that for some survivors the cancer experience elicits a search for meaning which is significantly associated with self-blame. This study extends developing nursing theory on survivorship by providing insight into the meaning of the cancer experience in long-term survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)628-633
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume21
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Survivors
Melanoma
Neoplasms
Nursing Theory
Survival Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Search for meaning in long-term cancer survivors. / Dirksen, Shannon.

In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 21, No. 4, 04.1995, p. 628-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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