Science leadership: Is it what you know, who you know or who you are?

Marla A. Parker, Eric Welch

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper examines the factors associated with the attainment of leadership positions of men and women academic scientists. Based on the literature, we develop hypotheses for three determinants of leadership: social relationships, reputation, and gender. Social relationships concern the importance of the network connections; reputation recognizes the importance of science ability; characteristics include individual traits such as gender. We test the resulting model on the likelihood of attaining three different types of academic science leadership - center leadership, university administrative leadership, and discipline leadership. Regression analysis uses data from a National Science Foundation funded survey of scientists in which social network, attitudinal and behavior data were collected to understand how social networks affect career trajectories of men and women. Findings show that while science reputation is strongly associated with center and discipline leadership, it is less strongly associated with administrative leadership. Also, large dense collaboration networks are important for center leadership, but the opposite is true for administrative leadership. Women are more likely to be in discipline leadership positions and less likely to be a leader of a research center or have an administrative university leadership position. Finally, having more women in the network reduces the likelihood of attaining discipline or center leadership positions. Conclusions interpret findings for policy and theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011, Proceedings
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011 - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Sep 15 2011Sep 17 2011

Other

Other2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period9/15/119/17/11

Fingerprint

Regression analysis
Trajectories

Keywords

  • Career development
  • educational institutions
  • social factors
  • sociology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Parker, M. A., & Welch, E. (2011). Science leadership: Is it what you know, who you know or who you are? In 2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011, Proceedings [6064480] https://doi.org/10.1109/ACSIP.2011.6064480

Science leadership : Is it what you know, who you know or who you are? / Parker, Marla A.; Welch, Eric.

2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011, Proceedings. 2011. 6064480.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Parker, MA & Welch, E 2011, Science leadership: Is it what you know, who you know or who you are? in 2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011, Proceedings., 6064480, 2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011, Atlanta, GA, United States, 9/15/11. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACSIP.2011.6064480
Parker MA, Welch E. Science leadership: Is it what you know, who you know or who you are? In 2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011, Proceedings. 2011. 6064480 https://doi.org/10.1109/ACSIP.2011.6064480
Parker, Marla A. ; Welch, Eric. / Science leadership : Is it what you know, who you know or who you are?. 2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011, Proceedings. 2011.
@inproceedings{043f7cc75f55489ea1a2e9bf959e7594,
title = "Science leadership: Is it what you know, who you know or who you are?",
abstract = "This paper examines the factors associated with the attainment of leadership positions of men and women academic scientists. Based on the literature, we develop hypotheses for three determinants of leadership: social relationships, reputation, and gender. Social relationships concern the importance of the network connections; reputation recognizes the importance of science ability; characteristics include individual traits such as gender. We test the resulting model on the likelihood of attaining three different types of academic science leadership - center leadership, university administrative leadership, and discipline leadership. Regression analysis uses data from a National Science Foundation funded survey of scientists in which social network, attitudinal and behavior data were collected to understand how social networks affect career trajectories of men and women. Findings show that while science reputation is strongly associated with center and discipline leadership, it is less strongly associated with administrative leadership. Also, large dense collaboration networks are important for center leadership, but the opposite is true for administrative leadership. Women are more likely to be in discipline leadership positions and less likely to be a leader of a research center or have an administrative university leadership position. Finally, having more women in the network reduces the likelihood of attaining discipline or center leadership positions. Conclusions interpret findings for policy and theory.",
keywords = "Career development, educational institutions, social factors, sociology",
author = "Parker, {Marla A.} and Eric Welch",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1109/ACSIP.2011.6064480",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781457713910",
booktitle = "2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011, Proceedings",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Science leadership

T2 - Is it what you know, who you know or who you are?

AU - Parker, Marla A.

AU - Welch, Eric

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - This paper examines the factors associated with the attainment of leadership positions of men and women academic scientists. Based on the literature, we develop hypotheses for three determinants of leadership: social relationships, reputation, and gender. Social relationships concern the importance of the network connections; reputation recognizes the importance of science ability; characteristics include individual traits such as gender. We test the resulting model on the likelihood of attaining three different types of academic science leadership - center leadership, university administrative leadership, and discipline leadership. Regression analysis uses data from a National Science Foundation funded survey of scientists in which social network, attitudinal and behavior data were collected to understand how social networks affect career trajectories of men and women. Findings show that while science reputation is strongly associated with center and discipline leadership, it is less strongly associated with administrative leadership. Also, large dense collaboration networks are important for center leadership, but the opposite is true for administrative leadership. Women are more likely to be in discipline leadership positions and less likely to be a leader of a research center or have an administrative university leadership position. Finally, having more women in the network reduces the likelihood of attaining discipline or center leadership positions. Conclusions interpret findings for policy and theory.

AB - This paper examines the factors associated with the attainment of leadership positions of men and women academic scientists. Based on the literature, we develop hypotheses for three determinants of leadership: social relationships, reputation, and gender. Social relationships concern the importance of the network connections; reputation recognizes the importance of science ability; characteristics include individual traits such as gender. We test the resulting model on the likelihood of attaining three different types of academic science leadership - center leadership, university administrative leadership, and discipline leadership. Regression analysis uses data from a National Science Foundation funded survey of scientists in which social network, attitudinal and behavior data were collected to understand how social networks affect career trajectories of men and women. Findings show that while science reputation is strongly associated with center and discipline leadership, it is less strongly associated with administrative leadership. Also, large dense collaboration networks are important for center leadership, but the opposite is true for administrative leadership. Women are more likely to be in discipline leadership positions and less likely to be a leader of a research center or have an administrative university leadership position. Finally, having more women in the network reduces the likelihood of attaining discipline or center leadership positions. Conclusions interpret findings for policy and theory.

KW - Career development

KW - educational institutions

KW - social factors

KW - sociology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=81255200271&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=81255200271&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/ACSIP.2011.6064480

DO - 10.1109/ACSIP.2011.6064480

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:81255200271

SN - 9781457713910

BT - 2011 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy: Building Capacity for Scientific Innovation and Outcomes, ACSIP 2011, Proceedings

ER -