Science and technology advice to state legislatures

David Guston, Megan Jones, Lewis M. Branscomb

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper examines technical information and decision making in state legislatures. Reporting on field work from eleven state legislatures, we examine: 1) their need for science and technology policy support; 2) internal and external sources of such support available to them; 3) the characteristics of useful support; 4) their use of computer technology; 5) the role of technical information in a political environment; 6) and their level of satisfaction with existing science and technology policy support. We find an increasing need for technical information and analysis and some satisfactory access to a variety of internal and external sources. But a lack of specialized expertise among staff, scarce access to prospective analyses, and unfulfilled expectations for the informational role of state universities limit satisfaction. State legislatures should consider: 1) improving internal staff expertise; 2) increasing computer access, use, and training for staff and legislators; and 3) facilitating access to state universities and inter-sectoral organizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Symposium on Technology and Society
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ, United States
PublisherIEEE
Pages43-54
Number of pages12
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1996 International Symposium on Technology and Society - Princeton, NJ, USA
Duration: Jun 21 1996Jun 22 1996

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1996 International Symposium on Technology and Society
CityPrinceton, NJ, USA
Period6/21/966/22/96

Fingerprint

Decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Guston, D., Jones, M., & Branscomb, L. M. (1996). Science and technology advice to state legislatures. In International Symposium on Technology and Society (pp. 43-54). Piscataway, NJ, United States: IEEE.

Science and technology advice to state legislatures. / Guston, David; Jones, Megan; Branscomb, Lewis M.

International Symposium on Technology and Society. Piscataway, NJ, United States : IEEE, 1996. p. 43-54.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Guston, D, Jones, M & Branscomb, LM 1996, Science and technology advice to state legislatures. in International Symposium on Technology and Society. IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, United States, pp. 43-54, Proceedings of the 1996 International Symposium on Technology and Society, Princeton, NJ, USA, 6/21/96.
Guston D, Jones M, Branscomb LM. Science and technology advice to state legislatures. In International Symposium on Technology and Society. Piscataway, NJ, United States: IEEE. 1996. p. 43-54
Guston, David ; Jones, Megan ; Branscomb, Lewis M. / Science and technology advice to state legislatures. International Symposium on Technology and Society. Piscataway, NJ, United States : IEEE, 1996. pp. 43-54
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