Scholarly journals as producers of knowledge: Theory and empirical evidence based on data envelopment analysis

Abagail Mcwilliams, Donald Siegel, David Van Fleet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There have been numerous studies that rank journals based on relative quality. These have generally failed to address some important theoretical and empirical issues relating to productivity. As an alternative, the authors outline a theoretical framework in which an academic journal is considered to be a "producer" of intellectual output. Using the field of management as an example, the authors specify the inputs and outputs of the production process and estimate the relative efficiency of journals using Data Envelopment Analysis. The derived measures of relative productivity are then used to develop a productivity ranking of journals. To explain why some journals use inputs more efficiently than others, the authors regress the estimates of relative efficiency on a set of managerial factors and suggest means to increase relative efficiency. The authors find that increasing the size of the editorial board and reducing both the subscription price and the acceptance rate will enhance the relative performance of an academic journal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-201
Number of pages17
JournalOrganizational Research Methods
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

Fingerprint

Data envelopment analysis
Productivity
Evidence-based
Empirical evidence
Relative efficiency
Academic journals

Keywords

  • DEA
  • Journal productivity
  • Journal rankings
  • Relative performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management
  • Decision Sciences(all)

Cite this

Scholarly journals as producers of knowledge : Theory and empirical evidence based on data envelopment analysis. / Mcwilliams, Abagail; Siegel, Donald; Van Fleet, David.

In: Organizational Research Methods, Vol. 8, No. 2, 04.2005, p. 185-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4293acedddf34132be9385da2a500ba1,
title = "Scholarly journals as producers of knowledge: Theory and empirical evidence based on data envelopment analysis",
abstract = "There have been numerous studies that rank journals based on relative quality. These have generally failed to address some important theoretical and empirical issues relating to productivity. As an alternative, the authors outline a theoretical framework in which an academic journal is considered to be a {"}producer{"} of intellectual output. Using the field of management as an example, the authors specify the inputs and outputs of the production process and estimate the relative efficiency of journals using Data Envelopment Analysis. The derived measures of relative productivity are then used to develop a productivity ranking of journals. To explain why some journals use inputs more efficiently than others, the authors regress the estimates of relative efficiency on a set of managerial factors and suggest means to increase relative efficiency. The authors find that increasing the size of the editorial board and reducing both the subscription price and the acceptance rate will enhance the relative performance of an academic journal.",
keywords = "DEA, Journal productivity, Journal rankings, Relative performance",
author = "Abagail Mcwilliams and Donald Siegel and {Van Fleet}, David",
year = "2005",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1177/1094428105275377",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "185--201",
journal = "Organizational Research Methods",
issn = "1094-4281",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Scholarly journals as producers of knowledge

T2 - Theory and empirical evidence based on data envelopment analysis

AU - Mcwilliams, Abagail

AU - Siegel, Donald

AU - Van Fleet, David

PY - 2005/4

Y1 - 2005/4

N2 - There have been numerous studies that rank journals based on relative quality. These have generally failed to address some important theoretical and empirical issues relating to productivity. As an alternative, the authors outline a theoretical framework in which an academic journal is considered to be a "producer" of intellectual output. Using the field of management as an example, the authors specify the inputs and outputs of the production process and estimate the relative efficiency of journals using Data Envelopment Analysis. The derived measures of relative productivity are then used to develop a productivity ranking of journals. To explain why some journals use inputs more efficiently than others, the authors regress the estimates of relative efficiency on a set of managerial factors and suggest means to increase relative efficiency. The authors find that increasing the size of the editorial board and reducing both the subscription price and the acceptance rate will enhance the relative performance of an academic journal.

AB - There have been numerous studies that rank journals based on relative quality. These have generally failed to address some important theoretical and empirical issues relating to productivity. As an alternative, the authors outline a theoretical framework in which an academic journal is considered to be a "producer" of intellectual output. Using the field of management as an example, the authors specify the inputs and outputs of the production process and estimate the relative efficiency of journals using Data Envelopment Analysis. The derived measures of relative productivity are then used to develop a productivity ranking of journals. To explain why some journals use inputs more efficiently than others, the authors regress the estimates of relative efficiency on a set of managerial factors and suggest means to increase relative efficiency. The authors find that increasing the size of the editorial board and reducing both the subscription price and the acceptance rate will enhance the relative performance of an academic journal.

KW - DEA

KW - Journal productivity

KW - Journal rankings

KW - Relative performance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=16644389131&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=16644389131&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1094428105275377

DO - 10.1177/1094428105275377

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:16644389131

VL - 8

SP - 185

EP - 201

JO - Organizational Research Methods

JF - Organizational Research Methods

SN - 1094-4281

IS - 2

ER -