SALSA: SAving lives staying active to promote physical activity and healthy eating

Rebecca Lee, Scherezade K. Mama, Ashley Medina, Raul Orlando Edwards, Lorna McNeill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physical inactivity, poor dietary habits, and obesity are vexing problems among minorities. SAving Lives, Staying Active (SALSA) was an 8-week randomized controlled crossover design, pilot study to promote regular physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption as a means to preventing weight gain among women of color. Participants completed measures of demographics, PA, and dietary habits. Women (N = 50; M = 42 years) who participated were overweight (M BMI = 29.7 kg/m2; M body fat = 38.5%) and reported low levels of leisure time PA (M = 10.7 MET-min/wk) and FV consumption (M = 4.2 servings/day). All were randomized to a four-week (1) semiweekly Latin dance group or (2) internet-based dietary education group. All participants reported a significant increase in weekly leisure time PA from baseline (M = 10.7 MET-min/wk) to follow up (M = 34.0 MET-min/wk, P <.001), and FV consumption increased over time by group (P =.02). Data suggest that Latin dance interventions to improve PA and web-based interventions to improve dietary habits show promise for improving health among women of color.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number436509
JournalJournal of Obesity
Volume2011
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Exercise
Feeding Behavior
Dancing
Vegetables
Fruit
Leisure Activities
Color
Women's Health
Internet
Cross-Over Studies
Weight Gain
Adipose Tissue
Obesity
Demography
Healthy Diet
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

SALSA : SAving lives staying active to promote physical activity and healthy eating. / Lee, Rebecca; Mama, Scherezade K.; Medina, Ashley; Orlando Edwards, Raul; McNeill, Lorna.

In: Journal of Obesity, Vol. 2011, 436509, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Rebecca ; Mama, Scherezade K. ; Medina, Ashley ; Orlando Edwards, Raul ; McNeill, Lorna. / SALSA : SAving lives staying active to promote physical activity and healthy eating. In: Journal of Obesity. 2011 ; Vol. 2011.
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